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Books About Deafness

Books About Deafness Series Cover

We have four novels for children on the subject of deafness. Three of them are by Deb Piper who has drawn on her more than twenty years' experience working with deaf children to write about the school life of Jake, who has become a particular favorite of hearing-impaired students, and has found a following among his peers in the mainstream.

Newcomer, Michael Thal, was a teacher who became severly hearing-impaired later in life. He has created the story of 12 year old David, a violinist who becomes suddenly deaf. He says: "Deafness is a silent disability. It isolates and ignores. We need to bring this issue to the forefront and help deaf children and their peers to come to learn how to live comfortably and positively with each other."

We have four novels for children on the subject of deafness. Three of them are by Deb Piper who has drawn on her more than twenty years' experience working with deaf children to write about the school life of Jake, who has become a particular favorite of hearing-impaired students, and has found a following among his peers in the mainstream.

Newcomer, Michael Thal, was a teacher who became severly hearing-impaired later in life. He has created the story of 12 year old David, a violinist who becomes suddenly deaf. He says: "Deafness is a silent disability. It isolates and ignores. We need to bring this issue to the forefront and help deaf children and their peers to come to learn how to live comfortably and positively with each other."

Jake's the Name: Sixth Grade's the Game Cover

Jake's the Name: Sixth Grade's the Game

Author:
Piper, Deb
Subjects:
School Experience; Family/social relationships; Disabilities; Deafness
Age:
10, 11, 12, 13
Grade:
5, 6, 7
Order code:
1358
Price:
$9.99
Website Price:
$7.99
Class sets:
10 or more: $7.00 each. Order code: 1358S

Here is a humorous, first-person account by a deaf boy mainstreamed into the sixth grade of a public school. He speaks of what it is like for him and of his perceptions of how other people react to him. Jake is a typical adolescent boy with opinions about everything, coping with the changes of growing up, trying to understand his parents who are tuned into adolescence, and trying to figure out his buddies who are now acting flat out weird around girls. He is also a scamp at heart, and his antics will make the reader laugh out loud.

Entertaining and informative, Jake will be particularly dear to mainstream receiving teachers, professionals in the deaf and hard of hearing field, interpreters, adolescents schooled in main-streamed classes, and their parents.

Deb Piper has been an Educational Interpreter for the Deaf for 25 years. She says: "As an avid reader with an interest in children's literature, I felt there was a void needing to be addressed for deaf and hard of hearing children about what experiences they confront on a daily basis in mainstream settings.  I wanted to approach familiar topics children could relate from a humorous perspective and a likable character. Jake seems to have accomplished that goal."

Jake's adventures continue in Those Sevy Blues and in the latest book, From A To Zulinski.

Here is a humorous, first-person account by a deaf boy mainstreamed into the sixth grade of a public school. He speaks of what it is like for him and of his perceptions of how other people react to him. Jake is a typical adolescent boy with opinions about everything, coping with the changes of growing up, trying to understand his parents who are tuned into adolescence, and trying to figure out his buddies who are now acting flat out weird around girls. He is also a scamp at heart, and his antics will make the reader laugh out loud.

Entertaining and informative, Jake will be particularly dear to mainstream receiving teachers, professionals in the deaf and hard of hearing field, interpreters, adolescents schooled in main-streamed classes, and their parents.

Deb Piper has been an Educational Interpreter for the Deaf for 25 years. She says: "As an avid reader with an interest in children's literature, I felt there was a void needing to be addressed for deaf and hard of hearing children about what experiences they confront on a daily basis in mainstream settings.  I wanted to approach familiar topics children could relate from a humorous perspective and a likable character. Jake seems to have accomplished that goal."

Jake's adventures continue in Those Sevy Blues and in the latest book, From A To Zulinski.

Series description
Those Sevy Blues Cover

Those Sevy Blues

Author:
Piper, Deb
Subjects:
Guidance; School Experience; Disabilities; Deafness
Age:
10, 11, 12, 13
Grade:
5, 6, 7
Order code:
4225
Price:
$9.99
Website Price:
$7.99
Class sets:
10 or more: $7.00 each. Order code: 4225S

Jake returns in the awaited sequel to Jake’s The Name: Sixth Grade’s The Game.

He’s in seventh grade now, and just as humorous and feisty, loaded with self-esteem and ready to share his experiences of being mainstreamed. The compassionate, strong and irascible interpreter, Mrs. Birge, returns, too. Seventh grade in Jackson Junior High School offers challenges, harrowing experiences and delicately wrought humorous insights as to what is like to be deaf and normal in a hearing world. The story starts with Day One and the dreaded book dump, and includes episodes in the boys’ locker room (changing into sports uniform en masse for the first time), basketball, Personal and Family Life Science (A.K.A. Home Eco./cooking), football (tackling practice), the Fall Fling (school dance), Industrial Technology and a bloody accident, Shakespeare in English class and studying for vocabulary/spelling tests, World Geography and foods to taste before they are identified, and cross country skiing. Jake also becomes introspective about his ISS (In School Suspension), and his possible jealousy about the new deaf kid in class, Jon, who is so good in sports and who might offer him competition for Mrs. Berge and elsewhere. Jake’s narrative ends on the last day of school, his last day of being a sevy. The class is at the Wide World Amusement Park, land of heart-stopping thrills and accidents waiting to happen.

His school experience continues into high school with From A to Zulinski.

Jake returns in the awaited sequel to Jake’s The Name: Sixth Grade’s The Game.

He’s in seventh grade now, and just as humorous and feisty, loaded with self-esteem and ready to share his experiences of being mainstreamed. The compassionate, strong and irascible interpreter, Mrs. Birge, returns, too. Seventh grade in Jackson Junior High School offers challenges, harrowing experiences and delicately wrought humorous insights as to what is like to be deaf and normal in a hearing world. The story starts with Day One and the dreaded book dump, and includes episodes in the boys’ locker room (changing into sports uniform en masse for the first time), basketball, Personal and Family Life Science (A.K.A. Home Eco./cooking), football (tackling practice), the Fall Fling (school dance), Industrial Technology and a bloody accident, Shakespeare in English class and studying for vocabulary/spelling tests, World Geography and foods to taste before they are identified, and cross country skiing. Jake also becomes introspective about his ISS (In School Suspension), and his possible jealousy about the new deaf kid in class, Jon, who is so good in sports and who might offer him competition for Mrs. Berge and elsewhere. Jake’s narrative ends on the last day of school, his last day of being a sevy. The class is at the Wide World Amusement Park, land of heart-stopping thrills and accidents waiting to happen.

His school experience continues into high school with From A to Zulinski.

Series description
From A to Zulinski Cover

From A to Zulinski

Author:
Piper, Deb
Subjects:
Guidance; School Experience; Disabilities; Deafness
Age:
13, 14, 15, 16
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
ISBN:
978-0-88092-713-0
Order code:
7130
Price:
$9.99
Website Price:
$7.99
Class sets:
10 or more: $7.00 each. Order code: 7130S

This is the third volume in the chronicles of the irrepressible Jake's schooling. We first met him in Jake's the Name, Sixth Grade's the Game and followed by his exploits in Those Sevy Blues.

Jake is deaf and has relied on an interpreter to sign the spoken words in his classrooms. For most of his teachers and classmates he was the first mainstreamed deaf student they had encountered.

By the time he has reached high school Jake has a deaf classmate and long acquaintance with his peers. They know what mischief he can generate. The book is a series of flashbacks from the perspective of high school graduation, and Jake Zulinski has plenty of time for remembrance while his classmates receive their diplomas in alphabetical order.

There was the explosion of parts in small engine repair and the major problem in the welding class. Jake is reminded of his first date, and the girl's father who was more than a little concerned. There was the problem of sign language in the darkroom in photography and of his female interpreter in the boys' locker room for track. Then there was the incident...but you'll have to read the book to find out how much mayhem one student can cause.

Deb Piper has drawn on her more than twenty years' experience working with deaf children to create this highly popular student. Jake has become a particular favorite of hearing-impaired students, and he has found a following among his peers in the mainstream.

This is the third volume in the chronicles of the irrepressible Jake's schooling. We first met him in Jake's the Name, Sixth Grade's the Game and followed by his exploits in Those Sevy Blues.

Jake is deaf and has relied on an interpreter to sign the spoken words in his classrooms. For most of his teachers and classmates he was the first mainstreamed deaf student they had encountered.

By the time he has reached high school Jake has a deaf classmate and long acquaintance with his peers. They know what mischief he can generate. The book is a series of flashbacks from the perspective of high school graduation, and Jake Zulinski has plenty of time for remembrance while his classmates receive their diplomas in alphabetical order.

There was the explosion of parts in small engine repair and the major problem in the welding class. Jake is reminded of his first date, and the girl's father who was more than a little concerned. There was the problem of sign language in the darkroom in photography and of his female interpreter in the boys' locker room for track. Then there was the incident...but you'll have to read the book to find out how much mayhem one student can cause.

Deb Piper has drawn on her more than twenty years' experience working with deaf children to create this highly popular student. Jake has become a particular favorite of hearing-impaired students, and he has found a following among his peers in the mainstream.

Series description
Goodbye Tchaikovsky: A Novel Cover

Goodbye Tchaikovsky: A Novel

Author:
Thal, Michael
Subjects:
School Experience; Disabilities; Deafness
Age:
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
Grade:
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
ISBN:
978-0-88092-469-6
Order code:
4696
This Book is Available as an iBook
Price:
$9.99
Website Price:
$7.99

Congratulations to Michael Thal for the "Honorable Mention" for Goodbye Tchaikovsky in the Hollywood Book Festival 2012 and in the Paris Book Festival 2013

"Highly recommended." The Midwest Book Review, Children's Bookwatch May 2012

"I recommend this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or other disability." Valerie Stern, Psychotherapist

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in, but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf world. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself."  Bergers Book Reviews

"... thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read." Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

" ...central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience" Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor.

 

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman, is plunged into a deaf world, necessitating him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall with rave reviews attracting the attention of the Queen of England. His future is laid out for him like a well-lit freeway. Then, on his birthday, David suffers from a sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world. Written from his own perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with this devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school?  How do you deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up in the suburbs of New York City on Long Island. After graduating from the University of Buffalo he earned his master’s degree in education at Washington University, St. Louis. When he moved to Los Angeles, he continued his education and earned anothermaster’s degree in Reading. He grew up in the hearing world and as a child played the violin, went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. When his daughters were still in elementary school, he woke up to a profound silence caused by a virus. The virus attacked again six years later making his right ear deaf and his left with a 65% loss. "I can understand people one-on-one, but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, the severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed.”

The Midwest Book Review: Told in first person perspective, Goodbye Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended.

Jamie Perlman, The Orange County Deaf Literacy Project writes: Michael Thal’s, “Goodbye Tchiakovsky”, is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss.  Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person.  I was very delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (non-verbally) from storybooks with a deaf pre-schooler who was learning English.  The book reminds the reader the importance of literacy for all deaf children.
 
Valerie Stern, LCSW, Psychotherapist, Los Angeles writes:
This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of 16, it would have given me hope, comfort and inspiration. I would recommend
this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or other disability.

Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf: Goodbye Tchaikovsky was thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read.. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David struggles through this life upheaval.

Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editorI really liked this book. Simple statement of fact-I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the aching loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But, central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David, just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. Kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all.

Congratulations to Michael Thal for the "Honorable Mention" for Goodbye Tchaikovsky in the Hollywood Book Festival 2012 and in the Paris Book Festival 2013

"Highly recommended." The Midwest Book Review, Children's Bookwatch May 2012

"I recommend this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or other disability." Valerie Stern, Psychotherapist

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in, but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf world. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself".  Bergers Book Reviews

"... thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read." Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

" ...central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience" Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor.

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman, is plunged into a deaf world, necessitating him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall with rave reviews attracting the attention of the Queen of England. His future is laid out for him like a well-lit freeway. Then, on his birthday, David suffers from a sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world. Written from his own perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with this devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school?  How do you deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up in the suburbs of New York City on Long Island. After graduating from the University of Buffalo he earned his master’s degree in education at Washington University, St. Louis. When he moved to Los Angeles, he continued his education and earned anothermaster’s degree in Reading. He grew up in the hearing world and as a child played the violin, went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. When his daughters were still in elementary school, he woke up to a profound silence caused by a virus. The virus attacked again six years later making his right ear deaf and his left with a 65% loss. "I can understand people one-on-one, but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, the severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed.”

Reviews:

The Midwest Book Review: Told in first person perspective, Goodbye Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended.

Jamie Perlman, The Orange County Deaf Literacy Project writes: Michael Thal’s, Goodbye Tchiakovsky is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss.  Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person.  I was very delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (non-verbally) from storybooks with a deaf pre-schooler who was learning English.  The book reminds the reader the importance of literacy for all deaf children.

Valerie Stern, LCSW, Psychotherapist, Los Angeles writes: This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of 16, it would have given me hope, comfort and inspiration. I would recommend this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or other disability.

Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf: Goodbye Tchaikovsky was thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read.. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David struggles through this life upheaval.

Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editorI really liked this book. Simple statement of fact-I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the aching loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But, central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David, just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. Kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all.

 

Goodbye Tchaikovsky pages 1-15: View online or Download PDF

Series description