The Death of Old Man Hanson

Author: Mull, David Kenneth

Subjects: Creative Problem Solving; Values; Social Relationships

Age: 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade: 4, 5, 6, 7

ISBN: 978-0-88092-445-0

Order code: 4450

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4450S

The Death of Old Man Hanson Cover

“An excellent book” Ohioana Library Association

Here is a romp for smart, pre-teen boys with a twinkle in their eyes and harmless, well-planned pranks in their hearts.

Old Man Hanson is a recluse, but his orchard has some of the best apples around, and he protects them mightily from the neighborhood kids, who never tire of trying to steal some, even though their attempts are doomed to failure. Getting the apples becomes a duel of wits, and the boys form the G.O.H. (Get Old Man Hanson) club. Plots and counter-plots, pranks and counter-pranks propel the humorous story. When Old Man Hanson dies, curiosity leads two of the boys into Hanson’s house. In the midst of their snooping, they experience Hanson’s best prank: they are trapped and must use their wits to escape within a specified time. They do escape, but not before going through a slew of mental hijinks.

Later, at the reading of Hanson’s will, the motivation behind his final prank becomes clear. He was a genius, a rich and lonely man with only a short time to live. The boys added fun to his last years. The tricks they played were harmless, thought-provoking, humorous, and at no time malicious. To thank them, he bequeaths to them his orchards as a business, his small personal library, and college tuition for certain studies. To benefit the community and the children, the orchard business is to be self-perpetuating, for as each child turns eighteen, another neighborhood child is to be chosen by the new adult as his replacement.

Respect for mental agility bridges the age differential. While enjoying the pranking youngsters' problem-solving abilities, Hanson planned to nurture those abilities for their future happiness and for the happiness of other children like them. When they matured, each group of youngsters would respect Hanson’s genius and purpose and carry it on for the next wave of young, creative thinkers.

David Kenneth Mull is a resident of Ohio. He was a teacher in the Akron Public School system for thirty years. He writes: "While I was teaching fifth grade, I decided to write this novel for the kids in my classroom. I meant it to be a fun, short, non-threatening book that they would want to read. It proved to be a wonderful teaching tool and an encouragement for the kids in my classes to be writers."

Mull is also the author of the series Charlie Cliché's Oft'told Tales, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

“An excellent book” – Ohioana Library Association

Here is a romp for smart, pre-teen boys with a twinkle in their eyes and harmless, well-planned pranks in their hearts.

Old Man Hanson is a recluse, but his orchard has some of the best apples around, and he protects them mightily from the neighborhood kids, who never tire of trying to steal some, even though their attempts are doomed to failure. Getting the apples becomes a duel of wits, and the boys form the G.O.H. (Get Old Man Hanson) club. Plots and counter-plots, pranks and counter-pranks propel the humorous story. When Old Man Hanson dies, curiosity leads two of the boys into Hanson’s house. In the midst of their snooping, they experience Hanson’s best prank: they are trapped and must use their wits to escape within a specified time. They do escape, but not before going through a slew of mental hijinks.

Later, at the reading of Hanson’s will, the motivation behind his final prank becomes clear. He was a genius, a rich and lonely man with only a short time to live. The boys added fun to his last years. The tricks they played were harmless, thought-provoking, humorous, and at no time malicious. To thank them, he bequeaths to them his orchards as a business, his small personal library, and college tuition for certain studies. To benefit the community and the children, the orchard business is to be self-perpetuating, for as each child turns eighteen, another neighborhood child is to be chosen by the new adult as his replacement.

Respect for mental agility bridges the age differential. While enjoying the pranking youngsters' problem-solving abilities, Hanson planned to nurture those abilities for their future happiness and for the happiness of other children like them. When they matured, each group of youngsters would respect Hanson’s genius and purpose and carry it on for the next wave of young, creative thinkers.

David Kenneth Mull is a resident of Ohio. He was a teacher in the Akron Public School system for thirty years. He writes: "While I was teaching fifth grade, I decided to write this novel for the kids in my classroom. I meant it to be a fun, short, non-threatening book that they would want to read. It proved to be a wonderful teaching tool and an encouragement for the kids in my classes to be writers."

Mull is also the author of the series Charlie Cliché's Oft'told Tales, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

The Death of Old Man Hanson Cover

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