For the Love of Gold

Author: Diller, Janelle

Subjects: Values; American History; Family Relationships; Mystery; Gold Mining

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Order code: 2680

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 2680S

For the Love of Gold Cover

Kansas State Reading Council Choice

“...a good lesson in the telling.” – The Provident Bookfinder

Colorado, 1896. Keziah Fursman hurries home alone after school. Hairless Henry Stokes, an oddball miner, follows her and warns her that her father had better stop taking his gold. Her family does not understand the message. Some months later, the family gains full ownership of a mine that Daniel Fursman, Keziah’s father, had grubstaked to veteran miner Jeb Rowley. Jeb died under curious circumstance. Daniel would prefer selling the mine to mining it.

Two fires destroy the town. Although Daniel is tempted to mine the vein he’s found, he is the town’s best carpenter, and he’s overwhelmed with work in rebuilding Cripple Creek. The family’s gold fever is put on hold. A neighbor, Mr. Schmieder, does strike a rich vein and immediately buys a huge house with all its accouterments. Keziah and her family are jealous. It appears that mining has made a better life for the Schmieders. Daniel decides to reopen his mine, but promising veins play out quickly, and the family finds itself in debt from the mine’s expenses. 

The Fursmans begin to see that all is not well with the Schmieder family. The Schmieders were poor and unhappy; now they are rich and unhappy. Fortunately for the Fursmans, Ethel Blade agrees to buy their mine as payment for their debts at her supply store. Keziah and Daniel return to the mine once more to collect Daniel's tools. Henry Stokes kidnaps Keziah, still believing that Daniel was stealing his gold—just as Jeb Rowley had done. Keziah reasons with him. To check her story, Stokes returns to Cripple Creek. He later releases her, unharmed. Keziah finally understands that the most precious gold is her family.

The novel has richly developed characters, and it is filled with historical atmosphere.

There is a teacher guide available for this book.

Kansas State Reading Council Choice

“...a good lesson in the telling.” – The Provident Bookfinder

Colorado, 1896. Keziah Fursman hurries home alone after school. Hairless Henry Stokes, an oddball miner, follows her and warns her that her father had better stop taking his gold. Her family does not understand the message. Some months later, the family gains full ownership of a mine that Daniel Fursman, Keziah’s father, had grubstaked to veteran miner Jeb Rowley. Jeb died under curious circumstance. Daniel would prefer selling the mine to mining it.

Two fires destroy the town. Although Daniel is tempted to mine the vein he’s found, he is the town’s best carpenter, and he’s overwhelmed with work in rebuilding Cripple Creek. The family’s gold fever is put on hold. A neighbor, Mr. Schmieder, does strike a rich vein and immediately buys a huge house with all its accouterments. Keziah and her family are jealous. It appears that mining has made a better life for the Schmieders. Daniel decides to reopen his mine, but promising veins play out quickly, and the family finds itself in debt from the mine’s expenses. 

The Fursmans begin to see that all is not well with the Schmieder family. The Schmieders were poor and unhappy; now they are rich and unhappy. Fortunately for the Fursmans, Ethel Blade agrees to buy their mine as payment for their debts at her supply store. Keziah and Daniel return to the mine once more to collect Daniel's tools. Henry Stokes kidnaps Keziah, still believing that Daniel was stealing his gold—just as Jeb Rowley had done. Keziah reasons with him. To check her story, Stokes returns to Cripple Creek. He later releases her, unharmed. Keziah finally understands that the most precious gold is her family.

The novel has richly developed characters, and it is filled with historical atmosphere.

There is a teacher guide available for this book.

For the Love of Gold Cover

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