Klaus

Author: Hagen, Michael

Subjects: European History; Nazi Germany; World War II

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Order code: 0955

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 0955S

Klaus Cover

The setting is Munich, Germany, November 8, 1923. Fourteen-year-old Klaus is celebrating his birthday quietly with his father in their simple apartment. His father had been a captain in the German Army during World War I, and his heartfelt gift to his son is the pocketwatch that had saved his life in battle.

Now Germany is in a time of economic disaster and political turmoil, a time when a pound of bread costs billions of marks and revolution is more probable than not. Although Klaus is aware of the political instability and feels danger for his father, who works for the head of the Social Democratic Party, which is hated by the members of the Nazi Party, he naively hopes that his father’s past military service and record—his affirmation of nationalism—might be a buffer to danger.

For young Klaus, Germany’s problems are still external. He is learning English from watching American western movies and wants to go to America to become an actor. Wondrously, he has just watched a stage rehearsal of “Hedda Gabler.” But on the way home from the rehearsal, his life changes abruptly. Klaus is caught in a wild crossfire and is wounded during Hitler’s attempted putsch. Later, Hitler’s brown-shirted Storm Troopers break into the apartment looking for his father. With his life threatened, Klaus knows that he must lie to save his father, but he is afraid to open his mouth for fear of bungling the job. Innocence was left behind in yesterday’s youth.

Michael Hagen writes with a fluidity and beauty that makes Klaus an unforgettable story. He is also the author of the historical novels Sail to Caribee and The African Term, both of which are published by Royal Fireworks Press. He is an accomplished stage actor and screenplay writer.

The setting is Munich, Germany, November 8, 1923. Fourteen-year-old Klaus is celebrating his birthday quietly with his father in their simple apartment. His father had been a captain in the German Army during World War I, and his heartfelt gift to his son is the pocketwatch that had saved his life in battle.

Now Germany is in a time of economic disaster and political turmoil, a time when a pound of bread costs billions of marks and revolution is more probable than not. Although Klaus is aware of the political instability and feels danger for his father, who works for the head of the Social Democratic Party, which is hated by the members of the Nazi Party, he naively hopes that his father’s past military service and record—his affirmation of nationalism—might be a buffer to danger.

For young Klaus, Germany’s problems are still external. He is learning English from watching American western movies and wants to go to America to become an actor. Wondrously, he has just watched a stage rehearsal of “Hedda Gabler.” But on the way home from the rehearsal, his life changes abruptly. Klaus is caught in a wild crossfire and is wounded during Hitler’s attempted putsch. Later, Hitler’s brown-shirted Storm Troopers break into the apartment looking for his father. With his life threatened, Klaus knows that he must lie to save his father, but he is afraid to open his mouth for fear of bungling the job. Innocence was left behind in yesterday’s youth.

Michael Hagen writes with a fluidity and beauty that makes Klaus an unforgettable story. He is also the author of the historical novels Sail to Caribee and The African Term, both of which are published by Royal Fireworks Press. He is an accomplished stage actor and screenplay writer.

Klaus Cover

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