The Shot Not Heard Around the World

Author: Damitz, Charlie

Subjects: American History; Revolutionary War; Medicine

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Order code: 4403

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4403S

The Shot Not Heard Around the World Cover

Young Jeremy has hunted rabbits and squirrels many times with his father in the woods near their farm. He is a good marksman with his musket. On April 19, 1775, he is one of those alerted by Paul Revere to the British march to Concord. The Redcoats are coming! Jeremy hurries to assume his assigned place in the Minuteman plan: a sniper behind a stone wall to hunt the Redcoats. He has practiced; he is ready. All he has to do is wait.

Yet when the moment comes to shoot the enemy, who is close enough to look into his eyes, Jeremy cannot. Nor can the giant of a Redcoat shoot Jeremy. In that moment, two unsung heroes are called into action, and bloodshed is averted. An understanding passes between them.

Jeremy keeps his mouth shut about the incident because no Minuteman would understand. After soul-searching about being a coward or a traitor to the cause of liberty, Jeremy finally decides to confide his innermost thoughts to Doc Thorndike, whom he has known all his life.

The answer is clear: Jeremy will train with Doc Thorndike to be a surgeon’s assistant, and as a team they will help the war effort as true patriots. Events lead a wounded Roger Poole, the Redcoat of Jeremy’s previous encounter, to hide in the chicken coop on Jeremy’s farm. Finding him, Jeremy sneaks him to Doc Thorndike for treatment. Roger, too, wants to be a doctor and to study with Doc Thorndike. The good doctor invents a new identity for Roger and now has two dedicated pupils. Their instruction is rigorous, hands-on, and graphic.

Soon the team is on its way to Bunker Hill to join the makeshift medical corps already there. At the Battle of Bunker Hill, they see the true horrors of war.

Author Charlie Damitz tells his story in an extended flashback, as the now elderly Doctor Jeremy recalls why he became a doctor. This is an easy read, even with its many details about anatomical, pathological, procedural, and other medical matters, because Jeremy’s youthful yet intelligent viewpoint prevails.

Young Jeremy has hunted rabbits and squirrels many times with his father in the woods near their farm. He is a good marksman with his musket. On April 19, 1775, he is one of those alerted by Paul Revere to the British march to Concord. The Redcoats are coming! Jeremy hurries to assume his assigned place in the Minuteman plan: a sniper behind a stone wall to hunt the Redcoats. He has practiced; he is ready. All he has to do is wait.

Yet when the moment comes to shoot the enemy, who is close enough to look into his eyes, Jeremy cannot. Nor can the giant of a Redcoat shoot Jeremy. In that moment, two unsung heroes are called into action, and bloodshed is averted. An understanding passes between them.

Jeremy keeps his mouth shut about the incident because no Minuteman would understand. After soul-searching about being a coward or a traitor to the cause of liberty, Jeremy finally decides to confide his innermost thoughts to Doc Thorndike, whom he has known all his life.

The answer is clear: Jeremy will train with Doc Thorndike to be a surgeon’s assistant, and as a team they will help the war effort as true patriots. Events lead a wounded Roger Poole, the Redcoat of Jeremy’s previous encounter, to hide in the chicken coop on Jeremy’s farm. Finding him, Jeremy sneaks him to Doc Thorndike for treatment. Roger, too, wants to be a doctor and to study with Doc Thorndike. The good doctor invents a new identity for Roger and now has two dedicated pupils. Their instruction is rigorous, hands-on, and graphic.

Soon the team is on its way to Bunker Hill to join the makeshift medical corps already there. At the Battle of Bunker Hill, they see the true horrors of war.

Author Charlie Damitz tells his story in an extended flashback, as the now elderly Doctor Jeremy recalls why he became a doctor. This is an easy read, even with its many details about anatomical, pathological, procedural, and other medical matters, because Jeremy’s youthful yet intelligent viewpoint prevails.

The Shot Not Heard Around the World Cover

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