The Surrender of Santa Fe

Author: Penn, M. E.

Subjects: American History; Native Americans; Pueblos; Spanish Conquest

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

ISBN: 978-0-89824-396-3

Order code: 3963

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 3963S

The Surrender of Santa Fe Cover

This novel tells the story of a significant event in the history of the Southwest: the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, which resulted in the killing of 400 Spaniards in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the driving out of the settlers. Readers learn the complex background for this event and, unusually, see it from both sides.

At daybreak on Saturday, August 7, 1680, the peaceful Pueblo tribe and the warrior Apache and Navajo tribes rose up against their mutual enemy. This book shows how a clash of cultures, religion, and ancient traditions resulted in dreadful bloodshed. We learn of the events as they were experienced by the Pueblos themselves, and by our fictional hero, young Juan, fresh from Spain, the son of a prominent Spanish military officer. With the stormclouds of the attack gathering, Juan must try to make sense of this new world where, amidst all the hate and the killings, he sees orphaned Native American children cared for, and where a beautiful Pueblo girl becomes his friend. He also wants to get to know and gain the respect of his emotionally distant father.

Notes from the author:
The first colonists in what would become the United States were not English but Hispanic. These European settlers traveled up the Camino Real from Mexico in 1598, bringing with them the first breeding horses, cattle, sheep, the wheel, gunpowder, written language, iron, and Christianity.

This was the only time in our history that an indigenous population of Native Americans, the Pueblos, successfully drove their European conquerors, the Spaniards, from their land. Most of the early books and articles written about the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 were written from the Spanish perspective using the meticulous records of the colonial government, but in recent years, articles and books, some written by Pueblo authors, represent the native point of view.

Regardless of personal bias, there is no doubt of the significance of this event, for the Pueblos accomplished something that no other Native Americans had done before and none would be able to do again: they united in an unprecedented way and took back their land. Even after the Spaniards successfully reinvaded New Mexico twelve years later, the Pueblos were allowed to preserve their culture and retain ownership of their villages. The encomienda system of forced labor was never re-established, and the aggressive missionary program was tempered by moderation.

M. E. Penn has an undergraduate degree in journalism and education and a master's degree in supervision and history. Her career includes being a teacher, a supervisor of teachers, and a Title I director working with underprivileged children. She has written several children's stories.

Reviews: 

"An excellent story of the early history of Santa Fe that is written in descriptive language that holds your attention and makes you feel like you were really there. You can feel the emotions of the Pueblos and the young man, Juan.... This is an excellent book for young people to help them understand the difficulties faced in the early history of our country with the clashes of cultures, religion, and traditions." – Emily P. Evertsen

"I am always looking for history books that come alive for middle school students. This story about the history of the surrender of Santa Fe is not only historically accurate but is written from the viewpoint of a young Spanish boy recently arrived in New Mexico to live with his father whom he grows to know, admire, and love. He meets a Native American girl of his age who has been cared for by local Spanish-Americans, and the young characters interact in a real and meaningful way. Others around them bring out the many points of view of the diverse population of New Mexico. This exciting American history book will help young students of today relate to the moving young characters of yesterday, who are expertly portrayed by the author." – Ann Berg, Ph.D., former teacher, principal, state educational consultant, and Director, Trinity University Principals’ Center, San Antonio, Texas

This novel tells the story of a significant event in the history of the Southwest: the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, which resulted in the killing of 400 Spaniards in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the driving out of the settlers. Readers learn the complex background for this event and, unusually, see it from both sides.

At daybreak on Saturday, August 7, 1680, the peaceful Pueblo tribe and the warrior Apache and Navajo tribes rose up against their mutual enemy. This book shows how a clash of cultures, religion, and ancient traditions resulted in dreadful bloodshed. We learn of the events as they were experienced by the Pueblos themselves, and by our fictional hero, young Juan, fresh from Spain, the son of a prominent Spanish military officer. With the stormclouds of the attack gathering, Juan must try to make sense of this new world where, amidst all the hate and the killings, he sees orphaned Native American children cared for, and where a beautiful Pueblo girl becomes his friend. He also wants to get to know and gain the respect of his emotionally distant father.

Notes from the author:
The first colonists in what would become the United States were not English but Hispanic. These European settlers traveled up the Camino Real from Mexico in 1598, bringing with them the first breeding horses, cattle, sheep, the wheel, gunpowder, written language, iron, and Christianity.

This was the only time in our history that an indigenous population of Native Americans, the Pueblos, successfully drove their European conquerors, the Spaniards, from their land. Most of the early books and articles written about the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 were written from the Spanish perspective using the meticulous records of the colonial government, but in recent years, articles and books, some written by Pueblo authors, represent the native point of view.

Regardless of personal bias, there is no doubt of the significance of this event, for the Pueblos accomplished something that no other Native Americans had done before and none would be able to do again: they united in an unprecedented way and took back their land. Even after the Spaniards successfully reinvaded New Mexico twelve years later, the Pueblos were allowed to preserve their culture and retain ownership of their villages. The encomienda system of forced labor was never re-established, and the aggressive missionary program was tempered by moderation.

M. E. Penn has an undergraduate degree in journalism and education and a master's degree in supervision and history. Her career includes being a teacher, a supervisor of teachers, and a Title I director working with underprivileged children. She has written several children's stories.

Reviews: 

"An excellent story of the early history of Santa Fe that is written in descriptive language that holds your attention and makes you feel like you were really there. You can feel the emotions of the Pueblos and the young man, Juan.... This is an excellent book for young people to help them understand the difficulties faced in the early history of our country with the clashes of cultures, religion, and traditions." – Emily P. Evertsen

"I am always looking for history books that come alive for middle school students. This story about the history of the surrender of Santa Fe is not only historically accurate but is written from the viewpoint of a young Spanish boy recently arrived in New Mexico to live with his father whom he grows to know, admire, and love. He meets a Native American girl of his age who has been cared for by local Spanish-Americans, and the young characters interact in a real and meaningful way. Others around them bring out the many points of view of the diverse population of New Mexico. This exciting American history book will help young students of today relate to the moving young characters of yesterday, who are expertly portrayed by the author." – Ann Berg, Ph.D., former teacher, principal, state educational consultant, and Director, Trinity University Principals’ Center, San Antonio, Texas

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