The Valedictorian

Author: Tchudi, Steven

Subjects: Guidance; School Experience; Emotional Needs; Twice-Exceptionality; Gifted Women and Girls; Growing Up Gifted

Age: 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Order code: 4489

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4489S

The Valedictorian Cover

Freshman Jennifer Bond was making good grades, applying herself, and enjoying success. She was happy…until Ms. Hart, her algebra teacher, summoned her to a talk about holding back in class, suppressing her ability in order to have a social life, and being a female in a man’s world. After flipping through Jennifer’s records as they spoke, Ms. Hart pronounced that Jennifer was good enough to make a run for valedictorian. Her grades and standardized test data put her among the top in the school, and she could overcome the advantages that those with higher IQs had simply by working harder. Once Jennifer buys into the valedictorian quest with gusto, a workaholic history professor, Dr. Gilman, helps feed into her need to “do more.” Overly influenced by his philosophy and studying the warring nature of countries, her competitiveness and skewed attitude toward people is augmented. The National Honor Society is a service club, but to Jennifer it becomes an assemblage of the enemy around her.

Slowly, like a junkie, Jennifer craves to do more and more homework and extra work that eats away at the social aspects of her life. She loses touch with her friends, breaks up with her boyfriend, becomes jealous of classmates who grasp things easily and produce seemingly effortlessly, and begins to see other smart kids as adversaries to be on guard against—even to plot against. She “sneaks” homework behind her concerned parents’ backs. The need for perfection becomes overwhelming, the situation critical. But an experienced female high school guidance counselor is there to step in with effective, nurturing, long-term help. In her senior year, Jennifer makes it back to the real world of responsibility and commitment, balanced with the fun of living a “normal” teenager’s life.

Jennifer tells her story in flashback, divided by her years in high school. There have been many stories about underachievers, their psychological pressures, their successes, and their failings. Jennifer’s story is different; it is about motivation from another angle. Hers is a story about a teenager possessed by the idea of overachieving.

Steven Tchudi has authored about 50 books for the general public, for teachers, and for young adult readers. A past-president of the National Council of Teachers of English and a former editor of The English Journal, he is also past-president of the Michigan and Nevada Councils of English Teachers. He resides in Reno, Nevada.

Freshman Jennifer Bond was making good grades, applying herself, and enjoying success. She was happy…until Ms. Hart, her algebra teacher, summoned her to a talk about holding back in class, suppressing her ability in order to have a social life, and being a female in a man’s world. After flipping through Jennifer’s records as they spoke, Ms. Hart pronounced that Jennifer was good enough to make a run for valedictorian. Her grades and standardized test data put her among the top in the school, and she could overcome the advantages that those with higher IQs had simply by working harder. Once Jennifer buys into the valedictorian quest with gusto, a workaholic history professor, Dr. Gilman, helps feed into her need to “do more.” Overly influenced by his philosophy and studying the warring nature of countries, her competitiveness and skewed attitude toward people is augmented. The National Honor Society is a service club, but to Jennifer it becomes an assemblage of the enemy around her.

Slowly, like a junkie, Jennifer craves to do more and more homework and extra work that eats away at the social aspects of her life. She loses touch with her friends, breaks up with her boyfriend, becomes jealous of classmates who grasp things easily and produce seemingly effortlessly, and begins to see other smart kids as adversaries to be on guard against—even to plot against. She “sneaks” homework behind her concerned parents’ backs. The need for perfection becomes overwhelming, the situation critical. But an experienced female high school guidance counselor is there to step in with effective, nurturing, long-term help. In her senior year, Jennifer makes it back to the real world of responsibility and commitment, balanced with the fun of living a “normal” teenager’s life.

Jennifer tells her story in flashback, divided by her years in high school. There have been many stories about underachievers, their psychological pressures, their successes, and their failings. Jennifer’s story is different; it is about motivation from another angle. Hers is a story about a teenager possessed by the idea of overachieving.

Steven Tchudi has authored about 50 books for the general public, for teachers, and for young adult readers. A past-president of the National Council of Teachers of English and a former editor of The English Journal, he is also past-president of the Michigan and Nevada Councils of English Teachers. He resides in Reno, Nevada.

The Valedictorian Cover

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