What So Proudly We Hail'd

Author: Levero, Diane

Subjects: American History; War of 1812; Newspapers

Age: 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

ISBN: 0-89824-054-88

Order code: 0548

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 0548S

What So Proudly We Hail'd Cover

Baltimore, 1812. Candace leaves finishing school and does the unthinkable for a young woman—goes to work in a newspaper office. She begins at the bottom and works her way up at the local paper, the Register. Soon she is caught up in the arguments about the War of 1812, the riots, and the British invasion. Along the way, she falls love with Zachary, a young man who she believes to be on the wrong side of every issue. All of this occurs against a social background filled with actual people of the period, the social snobbery of the rich and those aspiring to be like the rich, and the needs and work ethic of the working class.

Candace is a Democratic-Republican and is in favor of the war with England. Zachary, a Federalist actively against the war, has taken a leave of absence from his older brother’s law firm in Annapolis to help the publisher of the Federal Republican. Candace and Zachary develop a three-tiered relationship that is political, social, and personal. At once intelligent and affectionate, the pair falls in love even as they hotly debate whether the war should have been fought.

What So Proudly We Hail’d provides an accurate picture of the production of a newspaper in the early 1800s. In the re-creation of the Baltimore Riots of 1812, the author closely followed details provided in newspapers, court affidavits filed by some of the victims, and other contemporary records.

Like Candace and Zachary, today’s historians still debate the War of 1812. Under the terms of the peace treaty, neither side won much of anything. Most of the issues over which the country had gone to war faded of their own accord. But the war did achieve one thing: Britain could no longer view the United States as a collection of break-away colonies. At last it had to recognize the United States as a truly independent nation. With that reality established, Britain and the United States were free to become friendly nations and, eventually, strong allies.

Baltimore, 1812. Candace leaves finishing school and does the unthinkable for a young woman—goes to work in a newspaper office. She begins at the bottom and works her way up at the local paper, the Register. Soon she is caught up in the arguments about the War of 1812, the riots, and the British invasion. Along the way, she falls love with Zachary, a young man who she believes to be on the wrong side of every issue. All of this occurs against a social background filled with actual people of the period, the social snobbery of the rich and those aspiring to be like the rich, and the needs and work ethic of the working class.

Candace is a Democratic-Republican and is in favor of the war with England. Zachary, a Federalist actively against the war, has taken a leave of absence from his older brother’s law firm in Annapolis to help the publisher of the Federal Republican. Candace and Zachary develop a three-tiered relationship that is political, social, and personal. At once intelligent and affectionate, the pair falls in love even as they hotly debate whether the war should have been fought.

What So Proudly We Hail’d provides an accurate picture of the production of a newspaper in the early 1800s. In the re-creation of the Baltimore Riots of 1812, the author closely followed details provided in newspapers, court affidavits filed by some of the victims, and other contemporary records.

Like Candace and Zachary, today’s historians still debate the War of 1812. Under the terms of the peace treaty, neither side won much of anything. Most of the issues over which the country had gone to war faded of their own accord. But the war did achieve one thing: Britain could no longer view the United States as a collection of break-away colonies. At last it had to recognize the United States as a truly independent nation. With that reality established, Britain and the United States were free to become friendly nations and, eventually, strong allies.

What So Proudly We Hail'd Cover

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