2e Children

Twice-exceptional (2e) individuals demonstrate exceptional ability together with a disability, which results in a unique set of circumstances. Their exceptional ability may dominate, hiding their disability; their disability may dominate, hiding their exceptional ability; each may mask the other so that neither is recognized or addressed.

The books in this series all address twice-exceptionality in some way. Some are for parents and teachers; others are for children. Each offers a unique perspective on the issue of what to do with children who demonstrate giftedness in the midst of a disability or disorder so that these children can grow up proudly as the best versions of themselves that they have to offer the world.

Twice exceptional (2e) individuals demonstrate exceptional ability together with a disability, which results in a unique set of circumstances. Their exceptional ability may dominate, hiding their disability; their disability may dominate, hiding their exceptional ability; each may mask the other so that neither is recognized or addressed.

The books in this series all address twice-exceptionality in some way. Some are for parents and teachers; others are for children. Each offers a unique perspective on the issue of what to do with children who demonstrate giftedness in the midst of a disability or disorder so that these children can grow up proudly as the best versions of themselves that they have to offer the world.

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The Inconvenient Student

Subtitle: Critical Issues in the Identification and Education of Twice-Exceptional Students

Author: Postma, Dr. Michael

Subjects: Giftedness; Twice-Exceptionality; Learning Disabilities; Social/Emotional Issues

Pages: 199

ISBN: 978-0-88092-233-3

Order code: 2333

Price: $22.50
Website price: $15.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

The Inconvenient Student Cover

Twice-exceptional children are those who are both gifted and have a learning disability or an attentional or behavioral disorder. Because they have exceptionalities at both ends of the spectrum, their needs tend to go unmet. Often they are able to compensate for their disability with their giftedness, and their disability typically masks their giftedness, leaving them struggling enormously to perform at average levels, unnoticed by school systems. The Inconvenient Student, by Dr. Michael Postma, tackles the problem of identifying gifted kids who have dyslexia, dysgraphia, sensory processing disorder, auditory and visual processing disorders, ADD, autism or Asperger's, ODD, OCD, anxiety, and depression. Dr. Postma explains in detail what these children are like and how to accommodate their needs in the regular classroom so that they can strengthen their weaknesses and maximize their strengths.

"Dr. Postma’s book is practical yet detailed, research-driven, and filled with resources, strategies, and points of view, all designed to better understand and educate a fascinating world of twice-exceptional students. The book is strengthened by the stories, vignettes, and experiences of the author, who offers both personal and professional accounts of working with 2e students.... Dr. Postma’s Inconvenient Student stands out among a growing list of resources and publications in the field. It...serves its purpose of demystifying the misunderstood child with dual-exceptionalities. It needs to be in the hands of parents, teachers, administrators, and any other educator who believes in actualizing the talent and potential of this unique population of students." – Dr. Jaime A. Castellano, Florida Atlantic University

"Congratulations on your awesome new book. There are a lot of books written on this topic, but your compact volume is the best of them all, combining research, case studies, practical strategies, and—most of all—HOPE! I love that you debunk the myth of RTI as being a helpful provision for 2e kids, and you informed me greatly on the metaphysical aspects of the 2e brain. All in all, this book is a coup!" – Dr. James R. Delisle, gifted education expert and author

Twice-exceptional children are those who are both gifted and have a learning disability or an attentional or behavioral disorder. Because they have exceptionalities at both ends of the spectrum, their needs tend to go unmet. Often they are able to compensate for their disability with their giftedness, and their disability typically masks their giftedness, leaving them struggling enormously to perform at average levels, unnoticed by school systems. The Inconvenient Student, by Dr. Michael Postma, tackles the problem of identifying gifted kids who have dyslexia, dysgraphia, sensory processing disorder, auditory and visual processing disorders, ADD, autism or Asperger's, ODD, OCD, anxiety, and depression. Dr. Postma explains in detail what these children are like and how to accommodate their needs in the regular classroom so that they can strengthen their weaknesses and maximize their strengths.

"Dr. Postma’s book is practical yet detailed, research-driven, and filled with resources, strategies, and points of view, all designed to better understand and educate a fascinating world of twice-exceptional students. The book is strengthened by the stories, vignettes, and experiences of the author, who offers both personal and professional accounts of working with 2e students.... Dr. Postma’s Inconvenient Student stands out among a growing list of resources and publications in the field. It...serves its purpose of demystifying the misunderstood child with dual-exceptionalities. It needs to be in the hands of parents, teachers, administrators, and any other educator who believes in actualizing the talent and potential of this unique population of students." – Dr. Jaime A. Castellano, Florida Atlantic University

"Congratulations on your awesome new book. There are a lot of books written on this topic, but your compact volume is the best of them all, combining research, case studies, practical strategies, and—most of all—HOPE! I love that you debunk the myth of RTI as being a helpful provision for 2e kids, and you informed me greatly on the metaphysical aspects of the 2e brain. All in all, this book is a coup!" – Dr. James R. Delisle, gifted education expert and author

The Inconvenient Student Cover

The Inconvenient Student: sample pages:

My Twice-Exceptional Murphy

Subtitle: The True Story of a Gifted Dog

Author: Ault, Jennifer

Subjects: Dogs; Giftedness; Twice-Exceptionality; Animal Story

ISBN: 978-0-88092-264-7

Order code: 2647

Price: $12.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

My Twice-Exceptional Murphy Cover

Murphy was a special dog from the beginning. He was a happy puppy, and incredibly smart. Yet at about the age of five, he began exhibiting pervasive symptoms of anxiety and fear that rapidly took over his life. His story is one of struggle against unknown terrors and of the love and patient care that his dog mom (a.k.a. owner) provided to bring him back to health. It is a tale of love, determination, resilience, and inspiration.

The book is exceptionally emotionally rich, yet it also offers clear explanations of giftedness and twice-exceptionality for people who may be new to those topics. It presents a portrait of what being 2e can look like, but it does so through the figure of a dog. Murphy's journey was not easy, and his mom's journey alongside him was at times frustrating and discouraging, but no matter how challenging Murphy's problems were, one thing never changed: he and his mom loved each other deeply. Murphy's story present parents and other adults with insight into some of the ways in which real people must deal with twice-exceptionality in all its complexities, but it also offers 2e children the chance to see aspects of themselves in the nonthreatening context of an animal story. Among the lessons they will learn is that, no matter how much they may struggle, no matter how exasperated their parents may feel sometimes, they are still beautiful, valuable individuals who can be the light of someone's life. There is no better lesson than that.

“I thoroughly enjoyed reading Jennifer Ault’s My Twice-Exceptional Murphy. Jennifer is an excellent translator of dogspeak. Parents of 2e children, as well as the children themselves, will relate to this heart-warming story of Murphy’s development. A must-read for dog lovers everywhere.” Linda Kreger Silverman, Founder and Director, Institute for the Study of Advanced Development

Jennifer Ault is also the author of The Essential Guidebook for Parents of Gifted Children.

Murphy was a special dog from the beginning. He was a happy puppy, and incredibly smart. Yet at about the age of five, he began exhibiting pervasive symptoms of anxiety and fear that rapidly took over his life. His story is one of struggle against unknown terrors and of the love and patient care that his dog mom (a.k.a. owner) provided to bring him back to health. It is a tale of love, determination, resilience, and inspiration.

The book is exceptionally emotionally rich, yet it also offers clear explanations of giftedness and twice-exceptionality for people who may be new to those topics. It presents a portrait of what being 2e can look like, but it does so through the figure of a dog. Murphy's journey was not easy, and his mom's journey alongside him was at times frustrating and discouraging, but no matter how challenging Murphy's problems were, one thing never changed: he and his mom loved each other deeply. Murphy's story present parents and other adults with insight into some of the ways in which real people must deal with twice-exceptionality in all its complexities, but it also offers 2e children the chance to see aspects of themselves in the nonthreatening context of an animal story. Among the lessons they will learn is that, no matter how much they may struggle, no matter how exasperated their parents may feel sometimes, they are still beautiful, valuable individuals who can be the light of someone's life. There is no better lesson than that.

“I thoroughly enjoyed reading Jennifer Ault’s My Twice-Exceptional Murphy. Jennifer is an excellent translator of dogspeak. Parents of 2e children, as well as the children themselves, will relate to this heart-warming story of Murphy’s development. A must-read for dog lovers everywhere.” – Linda Kreger Silverman, Founder and Director, Institute for the Study of Advanced Development

Jennifer Ault is also the author of The Essential Guidebook for Parents of Gifted Children.

My Twice-Exceptional Murphy Cover

My Twice-Exceptional Murphy Sample Pages:

"Mellow Out," They Say. If I Only Could

Author: Piechowski, Michael M.

Subjects: Guidance; Emotional Needs; Gifted Education/Guidance; Asynchrony; Twice-Exceptionality

Pages: 377

ISBN: 978-089824-491-5

Order code: 4915

Price: $30.00
Website price: $25.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

"Mellow Out," They Say. If I Only Could Cover

This highly acclaimed and valued book, now in its second edition, is intended for parents and teachers of intense and sensitive young people and to serve the young people as a friendly mirror in which they can recognize themselves for who they are.

Dr. Michael Piechowski has been honored with a SENG Lifetime Achievement Award.

Gifted children and adults tend to be intense, and this intensity often makes them seem strange to others. Their reactions are often viewed by others as overreactions, when in fact these individuals are simply responding to the environment (both without and within) with the overexcitability that is a fundamental trait of giftedness. Mellow Out explores that intensity and sensitivity, giving voice to gifted youth in numerous excerpts throughout the book. 

In this updated edition, Piechowski introduces the concept of openness to experience that, together with intuition and overexcitability, forms the blend of personality characteristics typical of the great majority of gifted children. He expands on the topic of visual-spatial, picture, and nonvisual alternative thinkers, and he introduces the concept of emotional style and its six dimensions that have specific activation areas in the brain. In addition, he expands on the topic of spiritual giftedness, an often-neglected area of study within gifted populations.

About the first edition:

"Reading these pages is like having a heart-to-heart conversation with gifted youth. By letting them speak in their own voices, Michael Piechowski has afforded us the most honest glimpse into the Heart and Soul of giftedness." – Annemarie Roeper, Founder of the Roeper School, author of Educating Children for Life and My Life Experiences with Children

"It is like being introduced to my son for the first time." – parent of a gifted boy

"Your book is like striking gold for us! On the way to a movie, I was listening to you being interviewed on the radio. My two girls (ages 5 and 10) were in the back chatting away. Suddenly, my 10-year-old screamed, 'Mom!  He’s talking about me!  How does he know me?!' I explained that you don’t know her. She then said, 'That’s how I feel. That’s what goes on in my head too!'” – Kathy Bero, Watertown, WI

"For years, I have waited for Michael Piechowski to put together the full picture of what it means to be gifted. In this volume, he does just that. A book of magnificent proportions—it is erudite, down-to-earth, and written with a sensitivity that will cause readers to recognize in themselves the inner qualities of giftedness." – James R. Delisle, Ph.D., author of Gifted Children Speak Out, Guiding the Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Youth, and the Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide

"This book is Michael Piechowski’s long-awaited magnum opus on emotional intelligence. It resonates with the real voices of gifted adolescents who speak with insight and passion about the realities of their emotional lives." – Jane Piirto, Ph.D., author of Understanding Creativity, “My Teeming Brain”: Understanding Creative Writers, and Talented Children and Adults

"I believe people are going to have remarkable emotional experiences reading your book. Thank you for fighting the labeling of exceptionality as pathological. I like your contrast of emotionality and emotional intensity. The implicit question of what to do with all this intensity and sensitivity is answered in [this book] with all practicality, providing a sampler of helpful exercises for growth. The exercises come alive because you have studied them with real individuals’ real experiences that are compelling and too singular not to be true. This is a masterful book, apparently charming and innocent but packing a huge punch of higher reality." – Elizabeth Maxwell, Associate Director, Gifted Development Center

Michael M. Piechowski received his M.Sc. in plant physiology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, his hometown in Poland. After a year of study in Belgium, he came to the United States, obtaining a Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He taught at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, where he met Dr. Kazimierz Dabrowski. They worked together for eight years. Not interrupting their collaboration, Piechowski returned to the University of Wisconsin to obtain a Ph.D. in counseling psychology. Subsequently, he taught at the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, and Northland College, situated on Lake Superior’s Chequamegon Bay. He is a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Educational Advancement and Professor Emeritus, Northland College, Ashland, Wisconsin, where he introduced an experiential course in transpersonal psychology. He is a contributor to the Handbook of Gifted Education and the Encyclopedia of Creativity. His studies of self-actualizing people and moral exemplars led him to the study of emotional and spiritual giftedness. He has taught at the Honors Summer Institute at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, and has lectured in New Zealand and Australia. Since 2002 he has been involved with the Yunasa summer camp for highly gifted youth, organized by the Institute for Educational Advancement. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

This highly acclaimed and valued book, now in its second edition, is intended for parents and teachers of intense and sensitive young people and to serve the young people as a friendly mirror in which they can recognize themselves for who they are.

Dr. Michael Piechowski has been honored with a SENG Lifetime Achievement Award.

Gifted children and adults tend to be intense, and this intensity often makes them seem strange to others. Their reactions are often viewed by others as overreactions, when in fact these individuals are simply responding to the environment (both without and within) with the overexcitability that is a fundamental trait of giftedness. Mellow Out explores that intensity and sensitivity, giving voice to gifted youth in numerous excerpts throughout the book. 

In this updated edition, Piechowski introduces the concept of openness to experience that, together with intuition and overexcitability, forms the blend of personality characteristics typical of the great majority of gifted children. He expands on the topic of visual-spatial, picture, and nonvisual alternative thinkers, and he introduces the concept of emotional style and its six dimensions that have specific activation areas in the brain. In addition, he expands on the topic of spiritual giftedness, an often-neglected area of study within gifted populations.

About the first edition:

"Reading these pages is like having a heart-to-heart conversation with gifted youth. By letting them speak in their own voices, Michael Piechowski has afforded us the most honest glimpse into the Heart and Soul of giftedness." – Annemarie Roeper, Founder of the Roeper School, author of Educating Children for Life and My Life Experiences with Children

"It is like being introduced to my son for the first time." – parent of a gifted boy

"Your book is like striking gold for us! On the way to a movie, I was listening to you being interviewed on the radio. My two girls (ages 5 and 10) were in the back chatting away. Suddenly, my 10-year-old screamed, 'Mom!  He’s talking about me!  How does he know me?!' I explained that you don’t know her. She then said, 'That’s how I feel. That’s what goes on in my head too!'” – Kathy Bero, Watertown, WI

"For years, I have waited for Michael Piechowski to put together the full picture of what it means to be gifted. In this volume, he does just that. A book of magnificent proportions—it is erudite, down-to-earth, and written with a sensitivity that will cause readers to recognize in themselves the inner qualities of giftedness." – James R. Delisle, Ph.D., author of Gifted Children Speak OutGuiding the Social and Emotional Development of Gifted Youth, and the Gifted Kids’ Survival Guide

"This book is Michael Piechowski’s long-awaited magnum opus on emotional intelligence. It resonates with the real voices of gifted adolescents who speak with insight and passion about the realities of their emotional lives." – Jane Piirto, Ph.D., author of Understanding Creativity“My Teeming Brain”: Understanding Creative Writers, and Talented Children and Adults

"I believe people are going to have remarkable emotional experiences reading your book. Thank you for fighting the labeling of exceptionality as pathological. I like your contrast of emotionality and emotional intensity. The implicit question of what to do with all this intensity and sensitivity is answered in [this book] with all practicality, providing a sampler of helpful exercises for growth. The exercises come alive because you have studied them with real individuals’ real experiences that are compelling and too singular not to be true. This is a masterful book, apparently charming and innocent but packing a huge punch of higher reality." – Elizabeth Maxwell, Associate Director, Gifted Development Center

Michael M. Piechowski received his M.Sc. in plant physiology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, his hometown in Poland. After a year of study in Belgium, he came to the United States, obtaining a Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He taught at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, where he met Dr. Kazimierz Dabrowski. They worked together for eight years. Not interrupting their collaboration, Piechowski returned to the University of Wisconsin to obtain a Ph.D. in counseling psychology. Subsequently, he taught at the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, and Northland College, situated on Lake Superior’s Chequamegon Bay. He is a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Educational Advancement and Professor Emeritus, Northland College, Ashland, Wisconsin, where he introduced an experiential course in transpersonal psychology. He is a contributor to the Handbook of Gifted Education and the Encyclopedia of Creativity. His studies of self-actualizing people and moral exemplars led him to the study of emotional and spiritual giftedness. He has taught at the Honors Summer Institute at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, and has lectured in New Zealand and Australia. Since 2002 he has been involved with the Yunasa summer camp for highly gifted youth, organized by the Institute for Educational Advancement. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

"Mellow Out," They Say. If I Only Could Cover

Mellow Out sample pages:

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child

Author: Neville, Christine S.; Piechowski, Michael M.; Tolan, Stephanie S.

Subjects: Gifted Education; Gifted Education/Guidance; Asynchrony; Twice-Exceptionality

ISBN: 978-0-89824-380-2

Order code: 3802

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child Cover

WINNER OF THE LEGACY BOOK AWARD FOR SCHOLARS*

This is the first publication of the Columbus Group, which in February of 2014 held its first publicly-shared gathering in Albuquerque, New Mexico—a special event for the participants. Off the Charts is the most original and important publication on giftedness to appear in many years.

The editors have brought together nineteen essays by renowned gifted education specialists (see below for the full list) to produce this important publication.

Off the Charts is an exploration of the effects of asynchronous development on gifted children and adults. It contains sections on Asynchrony and the Individual, Asynchrony and the Family, and Asynchrony and Learning. Chapters describe the nature of asynchrony, methods of dealing with the challenges of asynchrony, and recommendations for adapting education in a variety of settings. 

The contributors' contention is that gifted education should be from a child-centered perspective, rather than from a "product perspective," in which the emphasis is on achievement, competition, and outer recognition. The child-centered approach concentrates on self-development and personal growth and fosters interrelatedness and wholeness. This is an important resource for parents, teachers, counselors, and others concerned with the optimal development of gifted to highly gifted individuals.

The book is dedicated to Annemarie Roeper (1918-2012), who before she died contributed a chapter. From the introduction: "Unusual intelligence, when understood, accepted, supported, allowed, and even celebrated, can lead, as it did for Annemarie, to a life experience of passion, accomplishment, service to the world, and deep personal meaning."

Review:

"Off the Charts by the 'mythical' and illustrious Columbus Group is an excellent book for parents, teachers, counselors, and others concerned with the optimal development of gifted to profoundly gifted individuals.... [It] will quickly top the chart of must-reads for parents and professionals alike." – Gifted Homeschoolers' Forum

CONTRIBUTORS:

Fiedler, Ellen D.
Gallagher, Shelagh A.
Gatto-Walden, Patricia
Hutton, Barbara Mitchell
Kane, Michele
Kearney, Kathi
Lovecky, Deirdre V.
Meckstroth, Elizabeth A.
Neville, Christine S.
Piechowski, Michael M.
Roeper, Annemarie
Silverman, Linda Kreger
Tolan, Stephanie S.
Wasserman, John D.

* The Legacy Book® Awards, a service from the Texas Association for the Gifted & Talented (TAGT), honor outstanding books published in the United States that have long-term potential for positively influencing the lives of gifted individuals and contribute to the understanding, well-being, education, and success of gifted and talented students. The Scholar category guides graduate students or advanced educators to understand and expand upon the latest research on giftedness and G/T education.

WINNER OF THE LEGACY BOOK AWARD FOR SCHOLARS*

This is the first publication of the Columbus Group, which in February of 2014 held its first publicly-shared gathering in Albuquerque, New Mexico—a special event for the participants. Off the Charts is the most original and important publication on giftedness to appear in many years.

The editors have brought together nineteen essays by renowned gifted education specialists (see below for the full list) to produce this important publication.

Off the Charts is an exploration of the effects of asynchronous development on gifted children and adults. It contains sections on Asynchrony and the Individual, Asynchrony and the Family, and Asynchrony and Learning. Chapters describe the nature of asynchrony, methods of dealing with the challenges of asynchrony, and recommendations for adapting education in a variety of settings. 

The contributors' contention is that gifted education should be from a child-centered perspective, rather than from a "product perspective," in which the emphasis is on achievement, competition, and outer recognition. The child-centered approach concentrates on self-development and personal growth and fosters interrelatedness and wholeness. This is an important resource for parents, teachers, counselors, and others concerned with the optimal development of gifted to highly gifted individuals.

The book is dedicated to Annemarie Roeper (1918-2012), who before she died contributed a chapter. From the introduction: "Unusual intelligence, when understood, accepted, supported, allowed, and even celebrated, can lead, as it did for Annemarie, to a life experience of passion, accomplishment, service to the world, and deep personal meaning."

Review:

"Off the Charts by the 'mythical' and illustrious Columbus Group is an excellent book for parents, teachers, counselors, and others concerned with the optimal development of gifted to profoundly gifted individuals.... [It] will quickly top the chart of must-reads for parents and professionals alike." – Gifted Homeschoolers' Forum

CONTRIBUTORS:

Fiedler, Ellen D.
Gallagher, Shelagh A.
Gatto-Walden, Patricia
Hutton, Barbara Mitchell
Kane, Michele
Kearney, Kathi
Lovecky, Deirdre V.
Meckstroth, Elizabeth A.
Neville, Christine S.
Piechowski, Michael M.
Roeper, Annemarie
Silverman, Linda Kreger
Tolan, Stephanie S.
Wasserman, John D.

* The Legacy Book® Awards, a service from the Texas Association for the Gifted & Talented (TAGT), honor outstanding books published in the United States that have long-term potential for positively influencing the lives of gifted individuals and contribute to the understanding, well-being, education, and success of gifted and talented students. The Scholar category guides graduate students or advanced educators to understand and expand upon the latest research on giftedness and G/T education.

Off the Charts: Asynchrony and the Gifted Child Cover

Off the Charts Sample Pages:

From Stress to Success

Subtitle: A Handbook for Parents and Teachers of Gifted Children

Author: Whitney, Carol Strip; Hirsch, Gretchen

Pages: 156

ISBN: 978-0-89824-624-7

Order code: 6247

Price: $19.99
Website price: $15.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

From Stress to Success Cover

Everyone experiences stress, but gifted children can experience it for a variety of reasons and in an array of situations that may be surprising to some people. Their keen intellects and heightened sensitivities make them vulnerable to stressors that may not affect other children, and their characteristic intensity can cause them to react in ways that might seem exaggerated and overblown to others. Adults who deal with these children, whether parents, teachers, or other family members or caregivers, can learn about the circumstances that can trigger stress in gifted children, and they can work to help these children learn how to manage themselves and their environments to enable them to find a sense of peace and calm that will make everyone happier.

Everyone experiences stress, but gifted children can experience it for a variety of reasons and in an array of situations that may be surprising to some people. Their keen intellects and heightened sensitivities make them vulnerable to stressors that may not affect other children, and their characteristic intensity can cause them to react in ways that might seem exaggerated and overblown to others. Adults who deal with these children, whether parents, teachers, or other family members or caregivers, can learn about the circumstances that can trigger stress in gifted children, and they can work to help these children learn how to manage themselves and their environments to enable them to find a sense of peace and calm that will make everyone happier.

From Stress to Success Cover

From Stress to Success sample pages :

The Same Difference

Author: Jacobs, Deborah Lynn

Subjects: Family Relationships; Twice-Exceptionality; Autism/Aspergers; Self-Esteem

Age: 13, 14, 15

Grade: 8, 9

Order code: 4659

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4659S

The Same Difference Cover

Fourteen-year-old Casey has a twin sister, Chelsea. Chelsea is autistic; Casey is not—or at least that is what she has always been told by her parents. But from the first day that Casey begins ninth grade in public school, she knows that she is in trouble as she begins to sense that her worst fears about herself may be true.

Previously, Casey had been homeschooled, allowing her to help her parents with her sister, but she decided that she wanted to go to regular school in order to meet other teenagers and have a more normal life. In regular school, it quickly becomes apparent that although she is bright with an amazing memory, Casey is completely inept at judging people’s reactions and interpreting nonverbal clues. She is abrupt, dominates conversations by spouting a torrent of facts, and is unaware of the negative responses of others. At times, she escapes into a dream world and tunes out those around her.

Anticipating difficulties, Casey’s parents had arranged for an in-school peer tutor, Scott, to teach her some interpersonal skills. Scott finds Casey odd but recognizes that she also has a sense of humor. A friendship grows, but as she begins to understand what friendship means and how to react to Scott’s needs as a friend, Casey also fears that she will make mistakes with his friendship and with others. Anxious about school and making friends, she begins to lose control. After an argument with Scott, she walks out of school and heads home. Scott follows and there meets Chelsea. He is fascinated, not repulsed.

In an effort to explain to Scott what is was like to grow up with an autistic twin, Casey shows him old videos of her sister's behavior modification training sessions and discovers a session of her own. It appears that she is not as normal as she has been led to believe. She shuts the world out. Only Scott being threatened by a bully brings Casey to Scott’s defense and to a turning point in her life.

Fourteen-year-old Casey has a twin sister, Chelsea. Chelsea is autistic; Casey is not—or at least that is what she has always been told by her parents. But from the first day that Casey begins ninth grade in public school, she knows that she is in trouble as she begins to sense that her worst fears about herself may be true.

Previously, Casey had been homeschooled, allowing her to help her parents with her sister, but she decided that she wanted to go to regular school in order to meet other teenagers and have a more normal life. In regular school, it quickly becomes apparent that although she is bright with an amazing memory, Casey is completely inept at judging people’s reactions and interpreting nonverbal clues. She is abrupt, dominates conversations by spouting a torrent of facts, and is unaware of the negative responses of others. At times, she escapes into a dream world and tunes out those around her.

Anticipating difficulties, Casey’s parents had arranged for an in-school peer tutor, Scott, to teach her some interpersonal skills. Scott finds Casey odd but recognizes that she also has a sense of humor. A friendship grows, but as she begins to understand what friendship means and how to react to Scott’s needs as a friend, Casey also fears that she will make mistakes with his friendship and with others. Anxious about school and making friends, she begins to lose control. After an argument with Scott, she walks out of school and heads home. Scott follows and there meets Chelsea. He is fascinated, not repulsed.

In an effort to explain to Scott what is was like to grow up with an autistic twin, Casey shows him old videos of her sister's behavior modification training sessions and discovers a session of her own. It appears that she is not as normal as she has been led to believe. She shuts the world out. Only Scott being threatened by a bully brings Casey to Scott’s defense and to a turning point in her life.

The Same Difference Cover

Goodbye Tchaikovsky: A Novel

Author: Thal, Michael

Subjects: School Experience; Disabilities; Deafness; Twice-Exceptionality

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

ISBN: 978-0-88092-469-6

Order code: 4696

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Goodbye Tchaikovsky: A Novel Cover

2nd Place, Royal Dragonfly Book Awards, Young Adult Fiction, 2015
Honorable Mention, Paris Book Festival, 2013
Honorable Mention, Hollywood Book Festival, 2012

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall and gets rave reviews that attract the attention of the Queen of England. His future is laid out for him like a well-lit freeway. Then, on his birthday, David suffers from sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world and forcing him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Written from David's perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with what he perceives as a devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school? How does he deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up on Long Island in the suburbs of New York City. After graduating from the University of Buffalo, he earned his master’s degree in education at Washington University, St. Louis. He moved to Los Angeles and continued his education, earning another master’s degree in reading. He grew up in the hearing world; as a child, he played the violin and went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. But as an adult, one day he woke up to deafness, the result of a virus. The virus attacked again six years later, causing him to lose his hearing entirely in his right ear and leaving him with 65% hearing loss in his left. He says, "I can understand people one on one, but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, the severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth-grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed."

Reviews:

"Told in first-person perspective, Goodbye Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended." – Midwest Book Review

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf world. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself." – Bergers Book Reviews

"Michael Thal’s Goodbye Tchiakovsky is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss. Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person. I was delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (nonverbally) from storybooks with a deaf preschooler who was learning English. The book reminds the reader the importance of literacy for all deaf children." – Jamie Perlman, Orange County Deaf Literacy Project
 
"This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of sixteen, it would have given me hope, comfort, and inspiration. I would recommend
 this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or another disability." – Valerie Stern, LCSW, psychotherapist, Los Angeles 

"Goodbye Tchaikovsky was thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David, struggles through this life upheaval." – Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

"I really liked this book. Simple statement of fact: I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable, as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David—just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. For kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all." – Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor

2nd Place, Royal Dragonfly Book Awards, Young Adult Fiction, 2015
Honorable Mention, Paris Book Festival, 2013
Honorable Mention, Hollywood Book Festival, 2012

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall and gets rave reviews that attract the attention of the Queen of England. His future is laid out for him like a well-lit freeway. Then, on his birthday, David suffers from sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world and forcing him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Written from David's perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with what he perceives as a devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school? How does he deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up on Long Island in the suburbs of New York City. After graduating from the University of Buffalo, he earned his master’s degree in education at Washington University, St. Louis. He moved to Los Angeles and continued his education, earning another master’s degree in reading. He grew up in the hearing world; as a child, he played the violin and went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. But as an adult, one day he woke up to deafness, the result of a virus. The virus attacked again six years later, causing him to lose his hearing entirely in his right ear and leaving him with 65% hearing loss in his left. He says, "I can understand people one on one, but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, the severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth-grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed."

Reviews:

"Told in first-person perspective, Goodbye Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended." – Midwest Book Review

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf world. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself." – Bergers Book Reviews

"Michael Thal’s Goodbye Tchiakovsky is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss. Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person. I was delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (nonverbally) from storybooks with a deaf preschooler who was learning English. The book reminds the reader the importance of literacy for all deaf children." – Jamie Perlman, Orange County Deaf Literacy Project
 
"This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of sixteen, it would have given me hope, comfort, and inspiration. I would recommend
 this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or another disability." – Valerie Stern, LCSW, psychotherapist, Los Angeles 

"Goodbye Tchaikovsky was thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David, struggles through this life upheaval." – Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

"I really liked this book. Simple statement of fact: I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable, as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David—just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. For kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all." – Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor

Goodbye Tchaikovsky: A Novel Cover

Goodbye Tchaikovsky sample pages:

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