Adventures on the American Frontier

Adventures on the American Frontier Series Cover

An American History Series for Children in the Elementary and Middle Grades

The Adventures on the American Frontier series is a collection of books that introduce children to some of the people who made a difference in the shaping of America, many of whom never get mentioned in traditional history textbooks.

Varying between the third- and eighth-grade reading levels, these illustrated books offer children a rich and rewarding way to learn about the pioneers, explorers, and adventures who helped to form this great nation.

There are more than a dozen books being produced for this series, each one covering a particular aspect of the historical foundation upon which the United States of America was constructed. Many history texts list facts about events; the Adventures on the American Frontier books tell the stories of the real people who were involved in those events, introducing children to an array of characters (many of whose names are typically glossed over or omitted entirely) who worked hard to bring about new, better, more exciting ways to push this country forward. Children who read standard history or social studies books often tend to forget the details of what they have read. Children who read about the individuals in this series will not soon forget how the United States grew to become what it is today.

This series will include a total of fifteen books; titles will be added as they become available. We also invite readers to view the Adventures on the American Frontier: Dyslexia Versions series. This series is a wonderful way for children with dyslexia and other visual processing problems to access the stories but in a format that includes several modifications to enable them to succeed at reading, including a special font and audio of the books being narrated. Click here to go to the Dyslexia Versions page, from which readers can select specific series to explore.

We are excited about this new offering, which will appeal both to parents who want their children to have access to interdisciplinary texts that encompass both history and reading, with a smattering of political science and geography thrown in for good measure, and to those who simply want their children to have something stimulating and enjoyable to read, even if it's just for fun!

Please check back often, as we will update this page as new books become available.

An American History Series for Children in the Elementary and Middle Grades

The Adventures on the American Frontier series is a collection of books that introduce children to some of the people who made a difference in the shaping of America, many of whom never get mentioned in traditional history textbooks.

Varying between the third- and eighth-grade reading levels, these illustrated books offer children a rich and rewarding way to learn about the pioneers, explorers, and adventures who helped to form this great nation.

There are more than a dozen books being produced for this series, each one covering a particular aspect of the historical foundation upon which the United States of America was constructed. Many history texts list facts about events; the Adventures on the American Frontier books tell the stories of the real people who were involved in those events, introducing children to an array of characters (many of whose names are typically glossed over or omitted entirely) who worked hard to bring about new, better, more exciting ways to push this country forward. Children who read standard history or social studies books often tend to forget the details of what they have read. Children who read about the individuals in this series will not soon forget how the United States grew to become what it is today.

This series will include a total of fifteen books; titles will be added as they become available. We also invite readers to view the Adventures on the American Frontier: Dyslexia Versions series. This series is a wonderful way for children with dyslexia and other visual processing problems to access the stories but in a format that includes several modifications to enable them to succeed at reading, including a special font and audio of the books being narrated. Click here to go to the Dyslexia Versions page, from which readers can select specific series to explore.

We are excited about this new offering, which will appeal both to teachers who want their students to have access to interdisciplinary texts that encompass both history and reading, with a smattering of political science and geography thrown in for good measure, and to those who simply want to provide their students with something stimulating and enjoyable to read after they finish their regular work or to supplement what they are learning in class.

Please check back often, as we will update this page as new books become available.

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Pirates and Privateers

Subtitle: Revised Edition

Author: McCall, Edith

Subjects: Pirates; Sailing Ships

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Pages: 89

ISBN: 978-0-89824-487-8

Order code: 4878

Price: $15.00
Website price: $10.00

Pirates and Privateers Cover

For centuries, pirates roved the seas, terrorizing honest ship captains and their crews with their thieving and murderous ways. By the 17th century, pirates began working their way along the eastern coast of the Americas, first in the West Indies and then up to the colonies in the new country that would soon become the United States. But the pirates of the Americas were of a special kind, and they called themselves buccaneers.

The story of the pirates of early America is one of both lawlessness and also of corruption, for many of the pirates were quietly and privately sanctioned by governors and other officials who received stolen goods or kickbacks from the sale of those goods in exchange for leaving the pirates alone. Later, the King of England thought that by pardoning pirates who agreed to give up piracy, he could transform them into privateersmen. A privateer was a ship whose owner had been given papers from his country’s government giving him permission to attack ships from enemy countries, much as a pirate might do. Some of the pirates went on to become privateersmen, but others used the king's pardon as a way of escaping punishment and went right on robbing and killing. 

But privateersmen were not always ex-pirates. Many captains who commanded privateers were law-abiding citizens who wanted to protect their countries when their governments' own militaries were insufficient and incapable of doing so. In fact, without the help of privateersmen, the United States might never have won its sovereignty from England because it had not yet organized a navy that was able to guard and defend all of its shores.

This swashbuckling book explores some of the pirates who sailed the open seas around America, as well as the privateersmen who defended their country when it could not defend itself, often changing history in the process.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

For centuries, pirates roved the seas, terrorizing honest ship captains and their crews with their thieving and murderous ways. By the 17th century, pirates began working their way along the eastern coast of the Americas, first in the West Indies and then up to the colonies in the new country that would soon become the United States. But the pirates of the Americas were of a special kind, and they called themselves buccaneers.

The story of the pirates of early America is one of both lawlessness and also of corruption, for many of the pirates were quietly and privately sanctioned by governors and other officials who received stolen goods or kickbacks from the sale of those goods in exchange for leaving the pirates alone. Later, the King of England thought that by pardoning pirates who agreed to give up piracy, he could transform them into privateersmen. A privateer was a ship whose owner had been given papers from his country’s government giving him permission to attack ships from enemy countries, much as a pirate might do. Some of the pirates went on to become privateersmen, but others used the king's pardon as a way of escaping punishment and went right on robbing and killing. 

But privateersmen were not always ex-pirates. Many captains who commanded privateers were law-abiding citizens who wanted to protect their countries when their governments' own militaries were insufficient and incapable of doing so. In fact, without the help of privateersmen, the United States might never have won its sovereignty from England because it had not yet organized a navy that was able to guard and defend all of its shores.

This swashbuckling book explores some of the pirates who sailed the open seas around America, as well as the privateersmen who defended their country when it could not defend itself, often changing history in the process.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

Pirates and Privateers Cover

Pirates and Privateers Sample Pages:

Mail Riders

Subtitle: Revised Edition

Author: McCall, Edith

Subjects: Mail Delivery; Pony Express

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 88

ISBN: 978-0-88092-486-3

Order code: 4863

Price: $15.00
Website price: $10.00

Mail Riders Cover

In the early days of the new nation that would become the United States of America, getting information from one area to another was not easy. There was no official mail service, nor, in fact, were there established roads on which to take mail from the eastern states to the cities that were popping up in the West. Each of these things had to be established, pioneered by ambitious individuals who dreamed of what could be done and then dared to do just that.

The first mail riders faced difficult and dangerous obstacles as they traveled through the wilderness to settlements that were anything but easy to get to. Treacherous terrain and harsh weather were just two of the hazards, but there were also native peoples who became angry at their treatment by the new government of America, which saw them as problems to be overcome instead of people whose rights and customs were worthy of honor and respect. For these reasons and more, it was not easy getting mail across the country. But there were people who persevered, in spite of the multiple threats they faced, and these people transformed the country, connecting East and West and the small places in between.

From Paul Revere (an unlikely early mail rider, unknown as such to most people) to the overland mail stagecoaches to the Pony Express, the United States went through a variety of methods of getting mail from one point to another, each building on the ones before. This book explores those methods and the people who created them and worked within them, besting the odds to deliver the mail.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

In the early days of the new nation that would become the United States of America, getting information from one area to another was not easy. There was no official mail service, nor, in fact, were there established roads on which to take mail from the eastern states to the cities that were popping up in the West. Each of these things had to be established, pioneered by ambitious individuals who dreamed of what could be done and then dared to do just that.

The first mail riders faced difficult and dangerous obstacles as they traveled through the wilderness to settlements that were anything but easy to get to. Treacherous terrain and harsh weather were just two of the hazards, but there were also native peoples who became angry at their treatment by the new government of America, which saw them as problems to be overcome instead of people whose rights and customs were worthy of honor and respect. For these reasons and more, it was not easy getting mail across the country. But there were people who persevered, in spite of the multiple threats they faced, and these people transformed the country, connecting East and West and the small places in between.

From Paul Revere (an unlikely early mail rider, unknown as such to most people) to the overland mail stagecoaches to the Pony Express, the United States went through a variety of methods of getting mail from one point to another, each building on the ones before. This book explores those methods and the people who created them and worked within them, besting the odds to deliver the mail.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

Mail Riders Cover

Mail Riders Sample Pages:

Cowboys and Cattle Drives

Subtitle: Revised Edition

Author: McCall, Edith

Subjects: Cowboys; Old West

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 86

ISBN: 978-0-88092-732-1

Order code: 7321

Price: $15.00
Website price: $10.00

Cowboys and Cattle Drives Cover

The cowboy is a romantic figure of the great American West, known for his quiet stoicism and the tough exterior that belied a soft heart when it came to his horse and the cows in his charge. But those are stories of archetypes and not of actual people. This book introduces children to some of the real people who influenced the development of the cowboy narrative as we know it today.

An essential part of the western economy was the development of the cattle industry, and cowboys played the integral part of getting herds to the markets where they were needed. Men like Charlie Goodnight and James Cook drove cattle herds huge distances across the wilderness, forging trails and learning their way as they traveled. At the end of the trail, towns sprang up, lawless and rowdy as the country worked toward a proper set of laws to govern everyone. Marshal Tom Smith, among other brave men, worked hard to bring law and order to these towns so that people could settle down and build their homes and families in communities that were healthy and safe. The life of a cattle-driving cowboy was so alluring that even as it drew to an end, easterners like Will Rogers wanted to pursue it, and Will himself wouldn't stop until he had achieved his dream and made it famous for everyone to see and appreciate. These are the real cowboys, and they come to life in this book

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

The cowboy is a romantic figure of the great American West, known for his quiet stoicism and the tough exterior that belied a soft heart when it came to his horse and the cows in his charge. But those are stories of archetypes and not of actual people. This book introduces children to some of the real people who influenced the development of the cowboy narrative as we know it today.

An essential part of the western economy was the development of the cattle industry, and cowboys played the integral part of getting herds to the markets where they were needed. Men like Charlie Goodnight and James Cook drove cattle herds huge distances across the wilderness, forging trails and learning their way as they traveled. At the end of the trail, towns sprang up, lawless and rowdy as the country worked toward a proper set of laws to govern everyone. Marshal Tom Smith, among other brave men, worked hard to bring law and order to these towns so that people could settle down and build their homes and families in communities that were healthy and safe. The life of a cattle-driving cowboy was so alluring that even as it drew to an end, easterners like Will Rogers wanted to pursue it, and Will himself wouldn't stop until he had achieved his dream and made it famous for everyone to see and appreciate. These are the real cowboys, and they come to life in this book

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

Cowboys and Cattle Drives Cover

Cowboys and Cattle Drives Sample Pages:

Pioneer Show People

Subtitle: Revised Edition

Author: McCall, Edith

Subjects: Entertainers; Early America

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 68

ISBN: 978-0-89824-739-8

Order code: 7398

Price: $15.00
Website price: $10.00

Pioneer Show People Cover

Being a pioneer on the American frontier was hard work. People had to build a home, raise some animals, and cultivate a garden for food, hunting and trapping to supplement what they needed and braving the elements all the while. It was a lonely existence, too. Many of the pioneers had to travel miles to the nearest homestead or settlement, often through dense woods and across rushing rivers. Many of these hard-scrabble settlers had only one way to experience entertainment and culture: pioneer show people.

The cities along the eastern coast of the United States often had various venues for providing shows and other forms of entertainment, including the theater, museums, and occasionally a circus, but the pioneers farther west had access to none of this. So acting companies like the Drake Players took their shows on the road to bring entertainment to the people. But the roads didn't go far, and soon the actors had to trade their wagons for a boat. They floated downriver, bringing plays to the towns and settlements that had sprung up along the river systems of America. As their popularity grew, so grew the boats, both in sophistication and in the quality of the entertainment. The Chapman showboat was the first boat to offer plays directly on the boat itself. Doc Spaulding's Floating Palace, pushed both up and down the rivers by its own steamboat, brought an entire circus to the riverside communities. Seeing a play or a show on a showboat was often the brightest day of the year for the pioneers who had forged past the edges of civilization to expand the boundaries of the United States. And then a small crack shot named Annie Oakley helped to show them what the great American West was all about.

The show people of early America were no less pioneers than the settlers who scraped and scratched out a life for themselves in the country's great wilderness, and this book brings to the forefront their importance in the expansion not just of culture but of an emerging entertainment industry that was blooming across the nation.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

Being a pioneer on the American frontier was hard work. People had to build a home, raise some animals, and cultivate a garden for food, hunting and trapping to supplement what they needed and braving the elements all the while. It was a lonely existence, too. Many of the pioneers had to travel miles to the nearest homestead or settlement, often through dense woods and across rushing rivers. Many of these hard-scrabble settlers had only one way to experience entertainment and culture: pioneer show people.

The cities along the eastern coast of the United States often had various venues for providing shows and other forms of entertainment, including the theater, museums, and occasionally a circus, but the pioneers farther west had access to none of this. So acting companies like the Drake Players took their shows on the road to bring entertainment to the people. But the roads didn't go far, and soon the actors had to trade their wagons for a boat. They floated downriver, bringing plays to the towns and settlements that had sprung up along the river systems of America. As their popularity grew, so grew the boats, both in sophistication and in the quality of the entertainment. The Chapman showboat was the first boat to offer plays directly on the boat itself. Doc Spaulding's Floating Palace, pushed both up and down the rivers by its own steamboat, brought an entire circus to the riverside communities. Seeing a play or a show on a showboat was often the brightest day of the year for the pioneers who had forged past the edges of civilization to expand the boundaries of the United States. And then a small crack shot named Annie Oakley helped to show them what the great American West was all about.

The show people of early America were no less pioneers than the settlers who scraped and scratched out a life for themselves in the country's great wilderness, and this book brings to the forefront their importance in the expansion not just of culture but of an emerging entertainment industry that was blooming across the nation.

To view this book as a series of dyslexia-friendly books, click here.

Pioneer Show People Cover

Pioneer Show People Sample Pages:

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