Books about Africa

Africa is one of the great unknowns for most American children. The continent is vast, its multitude of countries terra incognita, its diverse cultures unfamiliar, its rich history a blank, its problems unrecognized, and its politics unmentioned. Only its fauna are familiar to American children from their earliest ages, but that familiarity does not extend to its ecology, protection of its habitats and species, and desertification. We have found it difficult to get as many excellent titles as we would like to publish about Africa, but we are proud of the ones we have brought out. The Weaver’s Scar in particular has won awards and wide critical praise.

Africa is one of the great unknowns for most American children. The continent is vast, its multitude of countries terra incognita, its diverse cultures unfamiliar, its rich history a blank, its problems unrecognized, and its politics unmentioned. Only its fauna are familiar to American children from their earliest ages, but that familiarity does not extend to its ecology, protection of its habitats and species, and desertification. We have found it difficult to get as many excellent titles as we would like to publish about Africa, but we are proud of the ones we have brought out. The Weaver’s Scar in particular has won awards and wide critical praise.

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The Weaver's Scar: For Our Rwanda

Author: Crawford, Brian

Subjects: History; Africa; Immigration; Genocide

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

ISBN: 978-089824-477-9

Order code: 4779

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4779S

The Weaver's Scar: For Our Rwanda Cover

VOYA Magazine's Top Shelf Fiction for Middle School Readers

Skipping Stones Honor Award

The Weaver's Scar is the first young adult novel written in English and for an American audience dealing directly with the Rwandan genocide. It is a story of a Rwandan boy who manages to escape the 1994 genocide of the Tutsis and make it to America. It is a story that is both horrific and inspiring.

Faustin is a normal schoolboy who is good at running and soccer. But dark secrets of the past hang over his family, and his father disapproves of his friends and his football games. Things only start to make sense when the teachers at school begin to emphasize the division between the Tutsis and Hutus, a division that even makes its way to the soccer field.

As the terrible events of the genocide unfold, Faustin discovers what caused his father’s disability, experiences the cruelty of his schoolteachers, and sees first hand the horror of neighbor against neighbor. With his family slain, his only chance of survival lies in his running and his sheer courage to outwit the enemy. He does not have to do it alone, however; he discovers the value and courage of an unlikely friend.

The Weaver's Scar Teacher Manual contains 60 pages of discussion topics and background material for follow-up activities.

The author writes: "At its core, The Weaver's Scar is not about the Rwandan genocide per se; rather, the events of 1994 serve as a backdrop to a strained relationship between two friends whose families forbid their friendship. It is about a boy who does not understand his own father and whose misunderstanding causes him to hurt his father's feelings beyond repair. It is about a father who dreams of bigger things for his son. And it is about how the scars of our past wound our present."

Because the story does unfold during the genocide, there are several chilling and horrific scenes that younger and more sensitive readers may find challenging. With appropriate instructor support, however, the novel is a strong addition to middle and high school social studies and language arts curricula.

Reviews:

“In The Weaver’s Scar, readers will share in Faustin’s grief, anguish, and fear in this heart-breaking and well-written introduction to an area of the world rarely covered in middle school literature.” – VOYA Magazine

"The Weaver’s Scar is captivating, with a simple writing style that pulls readers in until the end. A powerful story of bravery, trust, and compassion, this book...gives an impactful and emotionally stirring experience of the tragic Rwandan genocide. The Weaver’s Scar offers readers a deeper understanding of humanity’s global connection and shared history, while providing strong support for a more peaceful, unified future." – Skipping Stones Award (see the full review)

"The Weaver’s Scar will appeal especially to boys and reluctant readers, with a perfect balance of social and historical context on one hand and a tale of two unlikely friends trying to escape a wave of violence they barely understand on the other. ...I think we sell young readers short when we assume they will not want to read this kind of book.... The Rwandan Genocide belied the post-Holocaust statement of 'never again,' and keeping our young people ignorant is going to mean that more 'never agains' happen again." – Lyn Miller-Lachmann, author, from The Pirate Tree: Social Justice and Children's Literature

"Crawford paints a vivid picture of both the horrifying events that Faustin survives and his fortuitous rescue and later immigration to America.... The dramatic first-person narrative allows readers to experience the story through Faustin's eyes, encouraging empathy and understanding." – School Library Journal

"It can be difficult to find a book that deals with tough real-world issues in a way that's sensitive to the developmental needs of middle school students. The Weaver's Scar fills this need nicely and is a fantastic addition to any social studies or English curriculum. Solidly rooted in history, this earnest tale of survival and growth will resonate with teachers and students alike. After studying the history of Rwanda and colonialism as a class, reading this novel brought the abstract dates on a page to life with relatable characters and developmentally appropriate themes." – Matt Stenovec, middle school humanities teacher and faculty team leader, Soundview School, Lynnwood, WA

"The weaver is the persistent little bird that surmounts every reversal of fortune as it tries to create a nest to procreate, always returning to square one, no matter how many obstacles it faces. Faustin received a scar in a soccer match with the Hutu boy who later befriended him. Faustin’s father had a scar on his ankle from the 1959 revolution that crippled him. Like the weaver bird, father and son continued to press their love of life despite their injuries. Crawford’s lesson is that this little bird is a metaphor for how Rwanda should overcome its past and prosecute its future. [This book] is a good introduction to Rwanda and its troubled past by an author and teacher who knows the situation well. It is an excellent read." – Professor Augustine Brannigan, University of Calgary, author of Beyond the Banality of Evil (OUP 2013)

"This wonderful young adult novel is a great and lasting accomplishment. The story is suspenseful, the characters vivid, and it teaches a lot of things, not just about Rwanda but also about friendship, life, kindness. Over the years, I have read this and that about the Rwandan genocide, book chapters, articles in magazines and newspapers—but the story of the friendship of Deo and Faustin is to me one of the most memorable…. The tone is serious but not preachy; it is accessible but by no means unsophisticated; it shows reality, but because its characters are fully fleshed-out, contradictory human beings, even the most gruesome events become comprehensible to the degree that the characters themselves can understand and process them.... It is a great read.”  – Dr. Martin Kagel, A.G. Steer Professor and Head of the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, University of Georgia

"From the first page I was fascinated by this harrowing tale of survival and friendship. Bringing to life the disturbing news of genocide in Rwanda, Crawford puts a human face on the people who lived through these terrible events. The tale of Faustin is gripping, captivating, and ultimately timeless. It is a story ripe for discussion on both a human and a literary level."  – Debbie Pearson, librarian, Seattle Country Day School

"It's hard to imagine a more compelling story. Faustin and Deo are forced into horrifying situations, but their journey, and the choices they make along the way, are true to the characters as well as the devastating history of the conflict. The Weaver's Scar should be in every school library. It will be an excellent addition to English and history curriculum."  – Sam Harris, M.Ed., MLIS, middle school librarian, Charles Wright Academy

Author Brian Crawford has traveled extensively around the world and has lived and worked in France. He is a resident of Seattle, Washington, where he teaches English. While an undergraduate and graduate student, Brian took a deep academic interest in the Holocaust and its impact on literature and film. As he was researching and writing The Weaver’s Scar, he learned basic Kinyarwanda. The goal was to create an engaging story—not about the genocide per se, but rather one that would inform readers about some of the main aspects of the genocide, all the while planting a seed of compassion for characters who were caught up in that horror. Brian’s hope is that readers will be inspired to learn more and to act with empathy and kindness in their day-to-day interactions.

VOYA Magazine's Top Shelf Fiction for Middle School Readers 

Skipping Stones Honor Award

The Weaver's Scar is the first young adult novel written in English and for an American audience dealing directly with the Rwandan genocide. It is a story of a Rwandan boy who manages to escape the 1994 genocide of the Tutsis and make it to America. It is a story that is both horrific and inspiring.

Faustin is a normal schoolboy who is good at running and soccer. But dark secrets of the past hang over his family, and his father disapproves of his friends and his football games. Things only start to make sense when the teachers at school begin to emphasize the division between the Tutsis and Hutus, a division that even makes its way to the soccer field.

As the terrible events of the genocide unfold, Faustin discovers what caused his father’s disability, experiences the cruelty of his schoolteachers, and sees first hand the horror of neighbor against neighbor. With his family slain, his only chance of survival lies in his running and his sheer courage to outwit the enemy. He does not have to do it alone, however; he discovers the value and courage of an unlikely friend.

The Weaver's Scar Teacher Manual contains 60 pages of discussion topics and background material for follow-up activities.

The author writes: "At its core, The Weaver's Scar is not about the Rwandan genocide per se; rather, the events of 1994 serve as a backdrop to a strained relationship between two friends whose families forbid their friendship. It is about a boy who does not understand his own father and whose misunderstanding causes him to hurt his father's feelings beyond repair. It is about a father who dreams of bigger things for his son. And it is about how the scars of our past wound our present."

Because the story does unfold during the genocide, there are several chilling and horrific scenes that younger and more sensitive readers may find challenging. With appropriate teacher support, however, the novel is a strong addition to middle and high school social studies and language arts curricula.

Reviews:

“In The Weaver’s Scar, readers will share in Faustin’s grief, anguish, and fear in this heart-breaking and well-written introduction to an area of the world rarely covered in middle school literature.” – VOYA Magazine

"The Weaver’s Scar is captivating, with a simple writing style that pulls readers in until the end. A powerful story of bravery, trust, and compassion, this book...gives an impactful and emotionally stirring experience of the tragic Rwandan genocide. The Weaver’s Scar offers readers a deeper understanding of humanity’s global connection and shared history, while providing strong support for a more peaceful, unified future." – Skipping Stones Award (see the full review)

"The Weaver’s Scar will appeal especially to boys and reluctant readers, with a perfect balance of social and historical context on one hand and a tale of two unlikely friends trying to escape a wave of violence they barely understand on the other. ...I think we sell young readers short when we assume they will not want to read this kind of book.... The Rwandan Genocide belied the post-Holocaust statement of 'never again,' and keeping our young people ignorant is going to mean that more 'never agains' happen again." – Lyn Miller-Lachmann, author, from The Pirate Tree: Social Justice and Children's Literature 

"Crawford paints a vivid picture of both the horrifying events that Faustin survives and his fortuitous rescue and later immigration to America.... The dramatic first-person narrative allows readers to experience the story through Faustin's eyes, encouraging empathy and understanding." – School Library Journal

"It can be difficult to find a book that deals with tough real-world issues in a way that's sensitive to the developmental needs of middle school students. The Weaver's Scar fills this need nicely and is a fantastic addition to any social studies or English curriculum. Solidly rooted in history, this earnest tale of survival and growth will resonate with teachers and students alike. After studying the history of Rwanda and colonialism as a class, reading this novel brought the abstract dates on a page to life with relatable characters and developmentally appropriate themes." – Matt Stenovec, middle school humanities teacher and faculty team leader, Soundview School, Lynnwood, WA

"The weaver is the persistent little bird that surmounts every reversal of fortune as it tries to create a nest to procreate, always returning to square one, no matter how many obstacles it faces. Faustin received a scar in a soccer match with the Hutu boy who later befriended him. Faustin’s father had a scar on his ankle from the 1959 revolution that crippled him. Like the weaver bird, father and son continued to press their love of life despite their injuries. Crawford’s lesson is that this little bird is a metaphor for how Rwanda should overcome its past and prosecute its future. [This book] is a good introduction to Rwanda and its troubled past by an author and teacher who knows the situation well. It is an excellent read." – Professor Augustine Brannigan, University of Calgary, author of Beyond the Banality of Evil (OUP 2013)

"This wonderful young adult novel is a great and lasting accomplishment. The story is suspenseful, the characters vivid, and it teaches a lot of things, not just about Rwanda but also about friendship, life, kindness. Over the years, I have read this and that about the Rwandan genocide, book chapters, articles in magazines and newspapers—but the story of the friendship of Deo and Faustin is to me one of the most memorable…. The tone is serious but not preachy; it is accessible but by no means unsophisticated; it shows reality, but because its characters are fully fleshed-out, contradictory human beings, even the most gruesome events become comprehensible to the degree that the characters themselves can understand and process them.... It is a great read.”  – Dr. Martin Kagel, A.G. Steer Professor and Head of the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, University of Georgia

"From the first page I was fascinated by this harrowing tale of survival and friendship. Bringing to life the disturbing news of genocide in Rwanda, Crawford puts a human face on the people who lived through these terrible events. The tale of Faustin is gripping, captivating, and ultimately timeless. It is a story ripe for discussion on both a human and a literary level."  – Debbie Pearson, librarian, Seattle Country Day School

"It's hard to imagine a more compelling story. Faustin and Deo are forced into horrifying situations, but their journey, and the choices they make along the way, are true to the characters as well as the devastating history of the conflict. The Weaver's Scar should be in every school library. It will be an excellent addition to English and history curriculum."  – Sam Harris, M.Ed., MLIS, middle school librarian, Charles Wright Academy

Author Brian Crawford has traveled extensively around the world and has lived and worked in France. He is a resident of Seattle, Washington, where he teaches English. While an undergraduate and graduate student, Brian took a deep academic interest in the Holocaust and its impact on literature and film. As he was researching and writing The Weaver’s Scar, he learned basic Kinyarwanda. The goal was to create an engaging story—not about the genocide per se, but rather one that would inform readers about some of the main aspects of the genocide, all the while planting a seed of compassion for characters who were caught up in that horror. Brian’s hope is that readers will be inspired to learn more and to act with empathy and kindness in their day-to-day interactions.

The Weaver's Scar: Teacher Manual

Author: Crawford, Brian

Subjects: History; Africa; Immigration; Genocide

ISBN: 978-0-89824-4793

Order code: 4793

Price: $10.00

The Weaver's Scar: Teacher Manual Cover

This substantial Teacher Manual to The Weaver's Scar provides the tools for a language arts or social studies teacher to build a multi-dimensional learning experience about genocide.

The author gives the historical and geographical background to the Rwandan genocide, chapter-by-chapter notes and activities, a glossary of key historical and cultural terms, a bibliography for further reading, and suggestons for ways to get involved with real-world solutions.

This substantial Teacher Manual to The Weaver's Scar provides the tools for a language arts or social studies teacher to build a multi-dimensional learning experience about genocide. 

The author gives the historical and geographical background to the Rwandan genocide, chapter-by-chapter notes and activities, a glossary of key historical and cultural terms, a bibliography for further reading, and suggestons for ways to get involved with real-world solutions.

The Weaver's Scar: Teacher Manual Cover

Weaver's Scar Teacher Manual Sample pages:

My Friend in Africa

Author: Franck, Frederick

Subjects: History; Personal Experience; Africa; Medicine; Schweitzer, Dr. Albert

Age: 8, 9, 10

Grade: 3, 4, 5

ISBN: 978-0-88092-325-5

Order code: 3253

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 3253S

My Friend in Africa Cover

This is the story of a young African boy who is brought to Schweitzer’s clinic for an infection in his foot. There, he comes to admire the doctor and wishes to become a doctor himself, but before he can do so, there is much he has to learn and unlearn. He finds a place and a set of duties at the hospital, only to be sent away by Dr. Schweitzer when his foot has healed. He later returns as a doctor.

My Friend in Africa is based on a true story and is delightfully illustrated by Dr. Franck. It was originally published as a joint publication with the Schweitzer Institute for the Humanities.

This is the story of a young African boy who is brought to Schweitzer’s clinic for an infection in his foot. There, he comes to admire the doctor and wishes to become a doctor himself, but before he can do so, there is much he has to learn and unlearn. He finds a place and a set of duties at the hospital, only to be sent away by Dr. Schweitzer when his foot has healed. He later returns as a doctor.

My Friend in Africa is based on a true story and is delightfully illustrated by Dr. Franck. It was originally published as a joint publication with the Schweitzer Institute for the Humanities.

My Friend in Africa Cover

My Days with Albert Schweitzer

Subtitle: A Lambaréné Landscape

Author: Franck, Frederick

Subjects: History; Personal Experience; Africa; Schweitzer, Dr. Albert

ISBN: 978-0-88092-326-2

Order code: 3261

Price: $14.99
Website price: $13.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $10.00 each.
Order code: 3261S

My Days with Albert Schweitzer Cover

Dr. Franck established and ran for two years the dental clinic at Albert Schweitzer's hospital at Lambaréné in Gabon. There, he was known as "the tooth doctor who draws." Dr. Franck was an accomplished artist whose works are part of the permanent collection of many museums. He had an eye for detail that informs and enlivens his account of life at Lambaréné with Dr. Schweitzer. Moreover, he has filled this book with sketches of the hospital, the village, the inhabitants, and Dr. Schweitzer. It is a sharp, insightful, and delightful book about an important African landscape and experience of sixty years ago.

Dr. Franck established and ran for two years the dental clinic at Albert Schweitzer's hospital at Lambaréné in Gabon. There, he was known as "the tooth doctor who draws." Dr. Franck was an accomplished artist whose works are part of the permanent collection of many museums. He had an eye for detail that informs and enlivens his account of life at Lambaréné with Dr. Schweitzer. Moreover, he has filled this book with sketches of the hospital, the village, the inhabitants, and Dr. Schweitzer. It is a sharp, insightful, and delightful book about an important African landscape and experience of sixty years ago.

My Days with Albert Schweitzer Cover

The African Term

Author: Hagen, Michael

Subjects: History; Peace Corps; Africa

Age: 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Order code: 3687

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 3687S

The African Term Cover

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps as a governmental agency whose aims were to raise living standards in developing countries and to promote international friendship and understanding. Peace Corps projects were established at the request of the host country, and volunteer personnel usually served two years.

The African Term is set in Addis Ababa, 1962. Tom Berk, a 42-year-old accountant-turned-teacher, has answered the Peace Corps call. There are 32 male students ranging in age from 12 to 24 occupying 16 double wooden desks in his gray, non-windowed classroom. A single 60-watt bulb hangs from the center of the ceiling. All of the students wear shorts and white shirts. Some do not wear shoes. Berk wears a busi­ness suit. Here, schooling is a great honor, and the students are outwardly respectful. All eyes are on the new teacher from America who will teach English, but one pair cannot mask its dislike.

Fifteen-year-old Sahle Kifle is filled with mistrust for the American; he is clear about his reasons in his conversations with his friends. However, he is one of the fortunate to go to school, so he must abide by Berk’s rules. He is not impressed by Berk’s ability to write in Ahmeric and to speak his language or by Berk’s preference to live among the local inhabitants. But as his friends begin to appreciate the teacher’s efforts to teach with understanding and in a friendly atmos­phere, Sahle begins to soften, much against his own wishes. By the time Berk must leave, pre­maturely, to go to his sick father’s bedside back in America, an understanding friendship has developed between the two; Berk appreciates Sahle’s intelligence, and Sahle trusts Berk.

The author handles Berk’s world in Addis Ababa outside of the classroom brilliantly. Unforgettable are his trek to get there, his house boy’s antics, the foods, the smells, the grit of the dirt, and the sound of the bugs. The school hierarchy and the punishment it doles out for minor infractions is striking. And Sahle’s home life and family relationships are relat­ed as naturally as if the reader was a casual eavesdropper in the kitchen.

Michael Hagen is an accomplished stage actor and screenplay writer who was in the Peace Corps. He is also the author of the historical novels Klaus and Sail to Caribee, both of which are published by Royal Fireworks Press.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps as a governmental agency whose aims were to raise living standards in developing countries and to promote international friendship and understanding. Peace Corps projects were established at the request of the host country, and volunteer personnel usually served two years.

The African Term is set in Addis Ababa, 1962. Tom Berk, a 42-year-old accountant-turned-teacher, has answered the Peace Corps call. There are 32 male students ranging in age from 12 to 24 occupying 16 double wooden desks in his gray, non-windowed classroom. A single 60-watt bulb hangs from the center of the ceiling. All of the students wear shorts and white shirts. Some do not wear shoes. Berk wears a busi­ness suit. Here, schooling is a great honor, and the students are outwardly respectful. All eyes are on the new teacher from America who will teach English, but one pair cannot mask its dislike.

Fifteen-year-old Sahle Kifle is filled with mistrust for the American; he is clear about his reasons in his conversations with his friends. However, he is one of the fortunate to go to school, so he must abide by Berk’s rules. He is not impressed by Berk’s ability to write in Ahmeric and to speak his language or by Berk’s preference to live among the local inhabitants. But as his friends begin to appreciate the teacher’s efforts to teach with understanding and in a friendly atmos­phere, Sahle begins to soften, much against his own wishes. By the time Berk must leave, pre­maturely, to go to his sick father’s bedside back in America, an understanding friendship has developed between the two; Berk appreciates Sahle’s intelligence, and Sahle trusts Berk.

The author handles Berk’s world in Addis Ababa outside of the classroom brilliantly. Unforgettable are his trek to get there, his house boy’s antics, the foods, the smells, the grit of the dirt, and the sound of the bugs. The school hierarchy and the punishment it doles out for minor infractions is striking. And Sahle’s home life and family relationships are relat­ed as naturally as if the reader was a casual eavesdropper in the kitchen.

Michael Hagen is an accomplished stage actor and screenplay writer who was in the Peace Corps. He is also the author of the historical novels Klaus and Sail to Caribee, both of which are published by Royal Fireworks Press.

The African Term Cover

The Spirit Walker

Author: Sullivan, Paul

Subjects: Adventure; Africa; Environmental Protection; Elephants; Conservation; Animal Story

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Order code: 3938

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 3938S

The Spirit Walker Cover

“All things are connected. The Earth to the Sun. The Moon to the Earth. Man to the land he walks on. All creatures to the wind, to the sky, to a blade of grass. Each bound by a spirit within. All connected to one hearing, one voice, one breathing. Through the wings of a butterfly a man can hear the earth in motion. He can hear, if he listens.”  So speaks Masuka, the African.

The Spirit Walker is a haunting novel of the feelings of man and beast. It contains multiple perceptions and stunning imagery. It is told with flashbacks and from both a human’s and an elephant’s point of view. The author deftly crafts a story about the web of nature and man's uneasy fit into it.

An elephant, more than fifty years old and an honest seven tons, has survived a poacher’s bullet lodged close to his heart, but the wound is slowly killing him. He recalls the family unit of his youth and its bloody slaughter, as well as the stench of one particular man. Now the old one is on the trail of the man who caused him such pain.

Teich is a sweaty, cigar-smoking poacher. He is unkempt, undignified, and unrespecting of any living thing. He fears only hippos. He carries a leg injury from the old elephant and is consumed with finding and finally killing him for revenge and for his huge ivory tusks. Young Tebe and his wife Kopela, trapped by economics, work for Teich but loathe him. Masuku is a mysterious old man who manipulates the poacher’s physical and emotional weaknesses to bring him into nature's just pattern.

The Spirit Walker will touch readers' minds and hearts. It is a tribute to nature and the African elephant, the largest and most powerful land animal, which Sullivan portrays with incredible insight and beauty.

“All things are connected. The Earth to the Sun. The Moon to the Earth. Man to the land he walks on. All creatures to the wind, to the sky, to a blade of grass. Each bound by a spirit within. All connected to one hearing, one voice, one breathing. Through the wings of a butterfly a man can hear the earth in motion. He can hear, if he listens.”  So speaks Masuka, the African.

The Spirit Walker is a haunting novel of the feelings of man and beast. It contains multiple perceptions and stunning imagery. It is told with flashbacks and from both a human’s and an elephant’s point of view. The author deftly crafts a story about the web of nature and man's uneasy fit into it.

An elephant, more than fifty years old and an honest seven tons, has survived a poacher’s bullet lodged close to his heart, but the wound is slowly killing him. He recalls the family unit of his youth and its bloody slaughter, as well as the stench of one particular man. Now the old one is on the trail of the man who caused him such pain.

Teich is a sweaty, cigar-smoking poacher. He is unkempt, undignified, and unrespecting of any living thing. He fears only hippos. He carries a leg injury from the old elephant and is consumed with finding and finally killing him for revenge and for his huge ivory tusks. Young Tebe and his wife Kopela, trapped by economics, work for Teich but loathe him. Masuku is a mysterious old man who manipulates the poacher’s physical and emotional weaknesses to bring him into nature's just pattern.

The Spirit Walker will touch readers' minds and hearts. It is a tribute to nature and the African elephant, the largest and most powerful land animal, which Sullivan portrays with incredible insight and beauty.

The Spirit Walker Cover

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