Creative Problem Solving: What To Do?

Creative Problem Solving: What To Do? Series Cover

There are three levels of What To Do? books, for children ages 5-14. At Levels A and B, the books contain activity pages that encourage children to analyze problems and develop solutions and scenarios of their results. Level C, for pre-teens and young teens, is a quantum leap to a more sophisticated level of problem solving. At this level, children confront high-interest, adolescent-type situations and enter a more complex problem-solving atmosphere.

At all levels, the problems encourage children to engage in critical thinking and Socratic dialogue to reach a solution. Every problem presents a conflict that the children must resolve, and most of them will not end with everyone perfectly happy. This is consistent with real life, in which we often must find the best option, the most satisfying solution, the answer that makes the most sense in the context of our lives as a whole. This is excellent practice for children as they grow and mature. It enables them to develop creative problem-solving skills that will benefit them in a multitude of ways and in a host of situations, allowing them to take a deliberate approach to the circumstances that surround and shape their lives.

There are three levels of What To Do? books, for students in kindergarten through grade 8. At Levels A and B, the books contain activity pages that encourage children to analyze problems and develop solutions and scenarios of their results. Level C, for pre-teens and young teens, is a quantum leap to a more sophisticated level of problem solving. At this level, children confront high-interest, adolescent-type situations and enter a more complex problem-solving atmosphere.

At all levels, the problems encourage children to engage in critical thinking and Socratic dialogue to reach a solution. Every problem presents a conflict that the children must resolve, and most of them will not end with everyone perfectly happy. This is consistent with real life, in which we often must find the best option, the most satisfying solution, the answer that makes the most sense in the context of our lives as a whole. This is excellent practice for children as they grow and mature. It enables them to develop creative problem-solving skills that will benefit them in a multitude of ways and in a host of situations, allowing them to take a deliberate approach to the circumstances that surround and shape their lives.

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What To Do? Level A Student Book

Author: Hegeman, Dr. Kathryn T.; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator)

Subjects: Creative Problem Solving; Problem Solving

Age: 5, 6, 7

Grade: K, 1, 2

Pages: 46

ISBN: 978-0-89824-043-6

Order code: 0433

Price: $13.00
Website price: $10.00

What To Do? Level A Student Book Cover

This book presents young children with fifteen problems, each one depicted through the pure, uncluttered medium of a full-page illustration. The illustrations show children in age-appropriate situations in which what they want or need is unavailable or unattainable, at least given the circumstances presented. Children must consider the problems and then answer basic questions about them and complete related extension activities.

But don't be fooled! The secret to the effectiveness of this book is that, although the problems are presented simply, they are often anything but simple. Each problem presents a scenario with no easy answers. Many of them coax children toward an understanding that getting what you want, how you want it, when you want it is often not possible; in real life, we often must compromise, or make the best of a less-than-ideal situation, or look for a new way of accomplishing our goal. These lessons are critical to children learning to be resilient, to be flexible, to persevere, to delay gratification, and, most importantly, to problem-solve, which will make them more effective at everything they hope to accomplish for the future, both personally and professionally.

This book also comes in a version that is printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that may make it easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. Click here for that version.

This book presents young children with fifteen problems, each one depicted through the pure, uncluttered medium of a full-page illustration. The illustrations show children in age-appropriate situations in which what they want or need is unavailable or unattainable, at least given the circumstances presented. Children must consider the problems and then answer basic questions about them and complete related extension activities.

But don't be fooled! The secret to the effectiveness of this book is that, although the problems are presented simply, they are often anything but simple. Each problem presents a scenario with no easy answers. Many of them coax children toward an understanding that getting what you want, how you want it, when you want it is often not possible; in real life, we often must compromise, or make the best of a less-than-ideal situation, or look for a new way of accomplishing our goal. These lessons are critical to children learning to be resilient, to be flexible, to persevere, to delay gratification, and, most importantly, to problem-solve, which will make them more effective at everything they hope to accomplish for the future, both personally and professionally.

This book also comes in a version that is printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that may make it easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. Click here for that version.

What To Do? Level A Student Book Cover

What To Do A Sample Pages:

What To Do? Level B Student Book

Author: Hegeman, Dr. Kathryn T.; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator)

Subjects: Creative Problem Solving; Problem Solving

Age: 8, 9

Grade: 3, 4

Pages: 62

ISBN: 978-0-89824-089-4

Order code: 0891

Price: $13.00
Website price: $10.00

What To Do? Level B Student Book Cover

This book presents young children with fifteen problems, each one depicted through the pure, uncluttered medium of a full-page illustration. The illustrations show children in age-appropriate situations in which what they want or need is unavailable or unattainable, at least given the circumstances presented. Children must consider the problems and then answer basic questions about them and complete related extension activities.

But don't be fooled! The secret to the effectiveness of this book is that, although the problems are presented simply, they are often anything but simple. Each problem presents a scenario with no easy answers. Many of them coax children toward an understanding that getting what you want, how you want it, when you want it is often not possible; in real life, we often must compromise, or make the best of a less-than-ideal situation, or look for a new way of accomplishing our goal. These lessons are critical to children learning to be resilient, to be flexible, to persevere, to delay gratification, and, most importantly, to problem-solve, which will make them more effective at everything they hope to accomplish for the future, both personally and professionally.

This book also comes in a version that is printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that may make it easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. Click here for that version.

This book presents young children with fifteen problems, each one depicted through the pure, uncluttered medium of a full-page illustration. The illustrations show children in age-appropriate situations in which what they want or need is unavailable or unattainable, at least given the circumstances presented. Children must consider the problems and then answer basic questions about them and complete related extension activities.

But don't be fooled! The secret to the effectiveness of this book is that, although the problems are presented simply, they are often anything but simple. Each problem presents a scenario with no easy answers. Many of them coax children toward an understanding that getting what you want, how you want it, when you want it is often not possible; in real life, we often must compromise, or make the best of a less-than-ideal situation, or look for a new way of accomplishing our goal. These lessons are critical to children learning to be resilient, to be flexible, to persevere, to delay gratification, and, most importantly, to problem-solve, which will make them more effective at everything they hope to accomplish for the future, both personally and professionally.

This book also comes in a version that is printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that may make it easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. Click here for that version.

What To Do? Level B Student Book Cover

What To Do B Sample Pages:

What To Do? Level C Student Book

Subtitle: Second Edition

Author: A Royal Fireworks Press Publication; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator)

Subjects: Creative Problem Solving; Problem Solving

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 42

ISBN: 978-0-88092-227-2

Order code: 2272

Price: $13.00
Website price: $10.00

What To Do? Level C Student Book Cover

This book presents seventeen age-appropriate problems that have no easy answers. It begins with a chart that helps children learn the ten steps toward effective problem solving. This chart is designed to ensure a problem solver’s careful analysis of the problem and possible solutions before undertaking action. A complete introductory lesson using the plan is included, giving pre-teens and teens a real-world scenario and then walking them through a solution using the steps from the chart. This sets them up to understand that, although finding solutions may take some effort, the ultimate goal is to learn to problem-solve using a reasoned, deliberate, focused approach that will lead to healthy decision-making and satisfying solutions, even when (and especially when) those solutions may not be what they originally envisioned.

After the sample are the problem scenarios. In each scenario, youngsters confront a high-interest, adolescent-type situation—the kind of situation that requires them not just to problem-solve but to think hard about what their values are, what kind of people they want to be, and how they want to present themselves as they develop into young adults. Decisions have consequences—some of them lasting—and that can be hard for kids at these ages to remember. The problems in this book remind them that they are no longer young children; they are developing autonomy, assuming responsibility for their actions, and they will want do so in ways that are both conscious and conscientious.

The problems are followed by open-ended questions to promote deep thinking and Socratic discussions. Even if some children don't feel comfortable having honest, open discussions about some of the issues presented, they can't help but contemplate what they would do in the scenarios, which are deliberately constructed so that all options, no matter how unsavory, have an element of legitimacy and attraction to them that lends them credence as live, valid options to consider. This is a relatively short but tough book that will get kids thinking critically and problem-solving creatively, which will stand them in good stead as they march toward adulthood.

This book presents seventeen age-appropriate problems that have no easy answers. It begins with a chart that helps children learn the ten steps toward effective problem solving. This chart is designed to ensure a problem solver’s careful analysis of the problem and possible solutions before undertaking action. A complete introductory lesson using the plan is included, giving pre-teens and teens a real-world scenario and then walking them through a solution using the steps from the chart. This sets them up to understand that, although finding solutions may take some effort, the ultimate goal is to learn to problem-solve using a reasoned, deliberate, focused approach that will lead to healthy decision-making and satisfying solutions, even when (and especially when) those solutions may not be what they originally envisioned.

After the sample are the problem scenarios. In each scenario, youngsters confront a high-interest, adolescent-type situation—the kind of situation that requires them not just to problem-solve but to think hard about what their values are, what kind of people they want to be, and how they want to present themselves as they develop into young adults. Decisions have consequences—some of them lasting—and that can be hard for kids at these ages to remember. The problems in this book remind them that they are no longer young children; they are developing autonomy, assuming responsibility for their actions, and they will want do so in ways that are both conscious and conscientious.

The problems are followed by open-ended questions to promote deep thinking and Socratic discussions. Even if some children don't feel comfortable having honest, open discussions about some of the issues presented, they can't help but contemplate what they would do in the scenarios, which are deliberately constructed so that all options, no matter how unsavory, have an element of legitimacy and attraction to them that lends them credence as live, valid options to consider. This is a relatively short but tough book that will get kids thinking critically and problem-solving creatively, which will stand them in good stead as they march toward adulthood.

What To Do? Level C Student Book Cover

What To Do C Sample Pages:

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