Historical Novels for Children: World History Before Columbus

These novels are set during the time period that spans ancient history through the discovery of the New World by Europeans in the fifteenth century.

These novels are set during the time period that spans ancient history through the discovery of the New World by Europeans in the fifteenth century.

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Jason and Medea

Author: Cargill, Linda

Subjects: History; Adventure; Classical Mythology

Age: 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

ISBN: 9780880925488

Order code: 5485

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 5485S

Jason and Medea Cover

"With both a strong hero and heroine, boys and girls alike can enjoy this classic tale of love and loyalty, danger and adventure, respect, magic and bravery." – Children’s Literature

Victorious in the battle of his life but set up by the king to be slaughtered with his Argonauts rather than be rewarded as promised, Jason is brave enough to attempt to steal the Golden Fleece against all odds. His people desperately need its favor and wondrous bounty. But without Medea’s help, Jason has no mere mortal's hope of getting the Fleece and bringing it home.

Medea will have to betray her family and her people to save the golden giant among men whom she has come to love. Together they will face the wrath of her father and his army and take on the gods. But to what personal end?

This Medea is unlike the Medea who most of us have come to know—the dark murderess of Euripides of Classical Greece (500-400 B.C.), when the religion of the Sky God Zeus had taken over. This book is set in Mycenean Greece (about 1250 B.C.), a time when God was a She. Medea follows her goddess Hecate. This is not the typical male interpretation of history or myth. Based on the Argonautica (or The Voyage of the Argo) of Apollonius of Rhodes, Cargill’s Medea isn’t just a witch; rather, she is a human being who loves and hurts. For her love, she has betrayed her family, has set out for an uncertain future in an unknown land, and must somehow reconcile her love of a man with her love of her homeland. From Medea’s point of view, readers see the world of ancient Greece and experience her anguish, motivations, and aspirations. She is believable, as are the novel’s other characters.

Jason and Medea showcases Linda Cargill’s love of the classics and literature and her ability to fine-tune an action-packed, spirited page-turner. Her lyrical language comes from her trained ear from reading the ancients. Her storytelling craft has been honed in more than twenty young adult horror and suspense novels. She lives in Tucson, Arizona.

"With both a strong hero and heroine, boys and girls alike can enjoy this classic tale of love and loyalty, danger and adventure, respect, magic and bravery." – Children’s Literature

Victorious in the battle of his life but set up by the king to be slaughtered with his Argonauts rather than be rewarded as promised, Jason is brave enough to attempt to steal the Golden Fleece against all odds. His people desperately need its favor and wondrous bounty. But without Medea’s help, Jason has no mere mortal's hope of getting the Fleece and bringing it home.

Medea will have to betray her family and her people to save the golden giant among men whom she has come to love. Together they will face the wrath of her father and his army and take on the gods. But to what personal end?

This Medea is unlike the Medea who most of us have come to know—the dark murderess of Euripides of Classical Greece (500-400 B.C.), when the religion of the Sky God Zeus had taken over. This book is set in Mycenean Greece (about 1250 B.C.), a time when God was a She. Medea follows her goddess Hecate. This is not the typical male interpretation of history or myth. Based on the Argonautica (or The Voyage of the Argo) of Apollonius of Rhodes, Cargill’s Medea isn’t just a witch; rather, she is a human being who loves and hurts. For her love, she has betrayed her family, has set out for an uncertain future in an unknown land, and must somehow reconcile her love of a man with her love of her homeland. From Medea’s point of view, readers see the world of ancient Greece and experience her anguish, motivations, and aspirations. She is believable, as are the novel’s other characters.

Jason and Medea showcases Linda Cargill’s love of the classics and literature and her ability to fine-tune an action-packed, spirited page-turner. Her lyrical language comes from her trained ear from reading the ancients. Her storytelling craft has been honed in more than twenty young adult horror and suspense novels. She lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Jason and Medea Cover

The Secret of Delphi

Author: Sodaro, Craig

Subjects: Ancient Greece; Theater; Greek Mythology

Age: 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

ISBN: 978-0-89824-322-2

Order code: 3222

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

The Secret of Delphi Cover

A deftly crafted and solidly entertaining novel...an especially and unreservedly recommended addition to both school and community library historical fiction collections. – Children's Bookwatch

In 468 B.C.E. in Athens, the young Sophocles entered the theater competition at the City Dionysia against the established favorite, Aeschylus. Victory in this competition was so important that even 2,500 years later we know who won and who lost. The competition was intense, and the stakes were high. The author weaves an exciting narrative about a conspiracy to ensure Aeschylus’s victory by sabotaging the productions of Sophocles and the other contestant. The kidnapping of the lead actor of Sophocles’s company inspires his two young daughters to defy the normal conventions that circumscribed the behavior of girls and to take a leading part in attempting to save their father and to restore fair play to the competition.

A deftly crafted and solidly entertaining novel...an especially and unreservedly recommended addition to both school and community library historical fiction collections. – Children's Bookwatch

In 468 B.C.E. in Athens, the young Sophocles entered the theater competition at the City Dionysia against the established favorite, Aeschylus. Victory in this competition was so important that even 2,500 years later we know who won and who lost. The competition was intense, and the stakes were high. The author weaves an exciting narrative about a conspiracy to ensure Aeschylus’s victory by sabotaging the productions of Sophocles and the other contestant. The kidnapping of the lead actor of Sophocles’s company inspires his two young daughters to defy the normal conventions that circumscribed the behavior of girls and to take a leading part in attempting to save their father and to restore fair play to the competition.

The Secret of Delphi Cover

The Secret of Delphi sample pages:

Taking Control

Author: Love, Ann

Subjects: Leadership; Historical Adventure; Ancient Greece; Alexander the Great

Age: 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade: 4, 5, 6, 7

Pages: 137

ISBN: 978-0-89824-998-9

Order code: 9989

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 9989S

Taking Control Cover

Julian is on a class trip to a museum when he meets Mr. Callisthenes, a strange figure who offers to take Julian to the past to teach him about Alexander the Great, a legendary hero who is nothing more than a name to most modern children. Julian, bored with history as dusty artifacts locked in display cases, agrees, and so begins a series of adventures during which Julian travels back in time to find himself present for each of the significant events in Alexander's life—not just as a witness but as an active participant.

On his first trip, Julian witnesses the now-famous scene of young Alexander gentling the great horse Bucephalus. During his next trip, Julian is present as Alexander's father, King Philip, is assassinated, and Alexander becomes ruler. Later Julian goes with Alexander to Troy to honor Achilles and make his claim as Achilles’s successor. Julian is at the Battle of Issus when Alexander defeats Darius, King of the Persians, and begins to subdue the Persian Empire. He watches the taking of Tyre and the slaughter of the townspeople. He sees Alexander going to consult the Oracle of Ammon in Siwa, and he and his sister Melanie are in attendance when Darius is killed, when Alexander decides to return to Macedonia, and finally when the great leader dies. Each visit to the ancient world provides Julian with a more complete understanding of the brilliant, ambitious, complex man who was Alexander the Great.

Julian is on a class trip to a museum when he meets Mr. Callisthenes, a strange figure who offers to take Julian to the past to teach him about Alexander the Great, a legendary hero who is nothing more than a name to most modern children. Julian, bored with history as dusty artifacts locked in display cases, agrees, and so begins a series of adventures during which Julian travels back in time to find himself present for each of the significant events in Alexander's life—not just as a witness but as an active participant.

On his first trip, Julian witnesses the now-famous scene of young Alexander gentling the great horse Bucephalus. During his next trip, Julian is present as Alexander's father, King Philip, is assassinated, and Alexander becomes ruler. Later Julian goes with Alexander to Troy to honor Achilles and make his claim as Achilles’s successor. Julian is at the Battle of Issus when Alexander defeats Darius, King of the Persians, and begins to subdue the Persian Empire. He watches the taking of Tyre and the slaughter of the townspeople. He sees Alexander going to consult the Oracle of Ammon in Siwa, and he and his sister Melanie are in attendance when Darius is killed, when Alexander decides to return to Macedonia, and finally when the great leader dies. Each visit to the ancient world provides Julian with a more complete understanding of the brilliant, ambitious, complex man who was Alexander the Great.

Taking Control Cover

Taking Control Sample Pages:

Tinyacha's Quest

Author: Jones, Thomas O.

Subjects: Folklore; Native Americans

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

ISBN: 978-0-88092-775-8

Order code: 7758

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Tinyacha's Quest Cover

This is a retelling of ancient American folklore of the native Wallas people, long before the Spanish came to Peru. The Wallas inhabited western Peru centuries before the Inca culture rose to preeminence.

A fantastic adventure, this is the tale of Tinyacha, a drummer boy in his early teens. It is set at the time of the festival honoring Wallala, the chief god. Tinyacha has his eye on Chinita, who has been chosen queen of the spring festival. In the course of the ceremony, Chinita disappears, and this sets Tinyacha on a quest where few of his people have ever gone—into the high Andes. Tinyacha must outwit the cunning, fierce She-bear and her spoiled son to save his life and that of Chinita. A condor, frogs, and a hummingbird are all caught up in the tense drama before he wins his sweetheart.

The story is based on the author's scholarship, but the tale is told in an engaging way to delight young readers.

Award-winning author Thomas O. Jones is also the author of Lord of the Geats, a vivid retelling of the ancient Anglo-Saxon poem Beowolf, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

This is a retelling of ancient American folklore of the native Wallas people, long before the Spanish came to Peru. The Wallas inhabited western Peru centuries before the Inca culture rose to preeminence.

A fantastic adventure, this is the tale of Tinyacha, a drummer boy in his early teens. It is set at the time of the festival honoring Wallala, the chief god. Tinyacha has his eye on Chinita, who has been chosen queen of the spring festival. In the course of the ceremony, Chinita disappears, and this sets Tinyacha on a quest where few of his people have ever gone—into the high Andes. Tinyacha must outwit the cunning, fierce She-bear and her spoiled son to save his life and that of Chinita. A condor, frogs, and a hummingbird are all caught up in the tense drama before he wins his sweetheart.

The story is based on the author's scholarship, but the tale is told in an engaging way to delight young readers.

Award-winning author Thomas O. Jones is also the author of Lord of the Geats, a vivid retelling of the ancient Anglo-Saxon poem Beowolf, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

Tinyacha's Quest Cover

The Flight of the Cliff Bird

Author: Wyatt, Leslie J.

Subjects: Historical Adventure; Girl Hero; Native Americans; Pueblos

Age: 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade: 4, 5, 6, 7

ISBN: 978-0-89824-493-9

Order code: 4939

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

The Flight of the Cliff Bird Cover

This book brings the ancient cliff dwellings to life.

High on the Colorado Plateau, “halfway between earth and sky,” the ancestors of the Pueblo people lived in precarious cliff dwellings and worked the arid land. What it was like for them more than 700 years ago can only be imagined and deduced from the artifacts they left behind.

Author Leslie J. Wyatt has brought The Long Ago People to life with the story of Cliff Bird, a young orphaned girl who is skilled in pottery and basket making—and who can run like the wind. Only Cliff Bird is fast enough to bring the warning of an attacking tribe. Her running saves the village and earns her respect from her adoptive family and elders. Throughout the story there is an element of threat: a lack of rain, lurking raiders, internal conflicts of jealousy and resentment, prejudice, and the ever-present danger of accidents on the steep rocks.

Readers will never again look at the remains of cliff dwellings and see just empty ruins. Wyatt shows us that the cliffs were once home to people who farmed, traded, hoped, feared, loved, and lost.

Leslie J. Wyatt was born in Utah, grew up in Montana, and lived with her husband for many years in Missouri. They now reside in Redding, California, back among the mountains that Leslie enjoys exploring on horseback. After twenty-four years of homeschooling their six children, she went on to pursue a degree in graphic arts.

Wyatt says about writing The Flight of the Cliff Bird: “Ever since I gazed across the canyon to the ancient homes nestled beneath the cap rock, the cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde, Colorado, have captured my heart and my imagination. As a child, I wanted to live there under the wide sky, to sit for long hours with my back against the warmth of the sandstone, to be one small being in the greatness of the canyon. Writing Cliff Bird’s story was an unfolding of that dream.”

And about the people: “The Hitsatsinom—The Long Ago People—never returned to farm the high green mesa where the sky was wide and blue or to live in their well-crafted dwellings under the canyon rims. Yet over the centuries, and still to this day, their descendants come back to Mesa Verde to visit the sacred sites and to pay homage to those who came before, for in this place their roots run deep.”

Wyatt is also the author of River Rats, set in 1940s rural Missouri, also published by Royal Fireworks Press.

This book brings the ancient cliff dwellings to life.

High on the Colorado Plateau, “halfway between earth and sky,” the ancestors of the Pueblo people lived in precarious cliff dwellings and worked the arid land. What it was like for them more than 700 years ago can only be imagined and deduced from the artifacts they left behind.

Author Leslie J. Wyatt has brought The Long Ago People to life with the story of Cliff Bird, a young orphaned girl who is skilled in pottery and basket making—and who can run like the wind. Only Cliff Bird is fast enough to bring the warning of an attacking tribe. Her running saves the village and earns her respect from her adoptive family and elders. Throughout the story there is an element of threat: a lack of rain, lurking raiders, internal conflicts of jealousy and resentment, prejudice, and the ever-present danger of accidents on the steep rocks.

Readers will never again look at the remains of cliff dwellings and see just empty ruins. Wyatt shows us that the cliffs were once home to people who farmed, traded, hoped, feared, loved, and lost.

Leslie J. Wyatt was born in Utah, grew up in Montana, and lived with her husband for many years in Missouri. They now reside in Redding, California, back among the mountains that Leslie enjoys exploring on horseback. After twenty-four years of homeschooling their six children, she went on to pursue a degree in graphic arts.

Wyatt says about writing The Flight of the Cliff Bird: “Ever since I gazed across the canyon to the ancient homes nestled beneath the cap rock, the cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde, Colorado, have captured my heart and my imagination. As a child, I wanted to live there under the wide sky, to sit for long hours with my back against the warmth of the sandstone, to be one small being in the greatness of the canyon. Writing Cliff Bird’s story was an unfolding of that dream.” 

And about the people: “The Hitsatsinom—The Long Ago People—never returned to farm the high green mesa where the sky was wide and blue or to live in their well-crafted dwellings under the canyon rims. Yet over the centuries, and still to this day, their descendants come back to Mesa Verde to visit the sacred sites and to pay homage to those who came before, for in this place their roots run deep.”

Wyatt is also the author of River Rats, set in 1940s rural Missouri, also published by Royal Fireworks Press.

The Flight of the Cliff Bird Cover

The Flight of the Cliff Bird sample pages:

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The Sword and the Cross

Author: Muschla, Gary Robert

Subjects: Medieval History; European History; Knights; Muslims; Christian History

Age: 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

ISBN: 978-88092-427-6

Order code: 4726

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4726S

The Sword and the Cross Cover

At age seventeen, Rodric becomes the young Count of Valenta when his parents are killed by the vile Ervig, the Lord of Aleveso. In 975, Valenta was on the northern edge of the Muslim penetration into the Christian-held lands in Spain. Rodric must deal with the Moors to the south, as well as with Ervig's aggressive designs, to become the preeminent lord among the Christians. As he learns whom he can trust and whom he must defend himself against, we learn a great deal about relations between Christians and Muslims more than a millennium ago.

Gary Robert Muschla is also the author of Crusaders, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

At age seventeen, Rodric becomes the young Count of Valenta when his parents are killed by the vile Ervig, the Lord of Aleveso. In 975, Valenta was on the northern edge of the Muslim penetration into the Christian-held lands in Spain. Rodric must deal with the Moors to the south, as well as with Ervig's aggressive designs, to become the preeminent lord among the Christians. As he learns whom he can trust and whom he must defend himself against, we learn a great deal about relations between Christians and Muslims more than a millennium ago.

Gary Robert Muschla is also the author of Crusaders, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

The Sword and the Cross Cover

Crusaders

Author: Muschla, Gary Robert

Subjects: Romance; Medieval History; Crusades

Age: 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Order code: 490X

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 490XS

Crusaders Cover

France, 1095. Raised in a monastery, sixteen-year-old Robert is not sure if he wants to commit his life to God or be a knight. His abbot hopes that at Clermont, where Pope Urban II will call upon Christians to liberate the Holy Land from the Muslim Turks, Robert will declare himself for God's army. At the council, Robert meets Count Edgar of Sarvaux and his lovely daughter Eleanor. Robert vows to liberate Jerusalem, joins with Count Edgar's group, and trains for war with them. Fernand, a hot-tempered knight, is Robert's rival for Eleanor, but it is Robert who saves her from a wild boar and then from the drunken Fernand.

Four months later, Edgard's party journeys to Cologne to join thousands of warriors and pilgrims under Peter the Hermit, who will lead them to the Holy Land. Battles and killings along the way prompt Robert and Eleanor to question their feelings about God and about each other. After reaching Constantinople, they sail across the Bosporus to Anatolia. In the Dracon Valley, their army is destroyed, but not before Edgard orders Robert to retreat and save Eleanor, who is back at the Christian camp. Eleanor misinterprets Robert's return as meaning he left her father to die to save her.

In their retreat, Robert and Eleanor come upon an attack on a merchant named Solomon ben Sahl. His caravan has been destroyed. Robert saves him. Thankful and realizing that Robert's abilities in French and Greek are compatible with his plans to expand business into the West, Solomon insists that Robert and Eleanor stay with him and his daughter Ruth in Constantinople. Wrestling with her guilt about being alive, Eleanor now believes that she has lost Robert to Ruth and vows that she will return to France alone. As soon as Robert leaves on a journey with Solomon to Antioch, Ruth tells Eleanor what really happened in the Dracon Valley.

Robert knows now that he will keep his vow to free Jerusalem, but he must first make sure that Eleanor has departed for France. He finds her waiting for him in Constantinople, and they both determine to rejoin the Crusade. Living through the final terrible battle for Jerusalem while Christian knights slaughter the inhabitants, Robert leads people to safety. Robert and Eleanor realize that their love is God's sign. They return to Constantinople to begin anew together.

Gary Robert Muschla is also the author of The Sword and the Cross, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

France, 1095. Raised in a monastery, sixteen-year-old Robert is not sure if he wants to commit his life to God or be a knight. His abbot hopes that at Clermont, where Pope Urban II will call upon Christians to liberate the Holy Land from the Muslim Turks, Robert will declare himself for God's army. At the council, Robert meets Count Edgar of Sarvaux and his lovely daughter Eleanor. Robert vows to liberate Jerusalem, joins with Count Edgar's group, and trains for war with them. Fernand, a hot-tempered knight, is Robert's rival for Eleanor, but it is Robert who saves her from a wild boar and then from the drunken Fernand.

Four months later, Edgard's party journeys to Cologne to join thousands of warriors and pilgrims under Peter the Hermit, who will lead them to the Holy Land. Battles and killings along the way prompt Robert and Eleanor to question their feelings about God and about each other. After reaching Constantinople, they sail across the Bosporus to Anatolia. In the Dracon Valley, their army is destroyed, but not before Edgard orders Robert to retreat and save Eleanor, who is back at the Christian camp. Eleanor misinterprets Robert's return as meaning he left her father to die to save her.

In their retreat, Robert and Eleanor come upon an attack on a merchant named Solomon ben Sahl. His caravan has been destroyed. Robert saves him. Thankful and realizing that Robert's abilities in French and Greek are compatible with his plans to expand business into the West, Solomon insists that Robert and Eleanor stay with him and his daughter Ruth in Constantinople. Wrestling with her guilt about being alive, Eleanor now believes that she has lost Robert to Ruth and vows that she will return to France alone. As soon as Robert leaves on a journey with Solomon to Antioch, Ruth tells Eleanor what really happened in the Dracon Valley.

Robert knows now that he will keep his vow to free Jerusalem, but he must first make sure that Eleanor has departed for France. He finds her waiting for him in Constantinople, and they both determine to rejoin the Crusade. Living through the final terrible battle for Jerusalem while Christian knights slaughter the inhabitants, Robert leads people to safety. Robert and Eleanor realize that their love is God's sign. They return to Constantinople to begin anew together.

Gary Robert Muschla is also the author of The Sword and the Cross, published by Royal Fireworks Press.

Crusaders Cover

Julietta

Author: Saturen, Myra

Subjects: Jewish History; Medieval History; Medicine; Gifted Women and Girls

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

ISBN: 0-88092-538-8

Order code: 5388

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 5388S

Julietta Cover

Troyes, France, 1283. Among medieval physicians, a courageous few were women. They faced popular prejudice and furious opposition to their participation in the medical field. Yet fourteen-year-old Julietta’s dream had always been to dare to follow in the footsteps of her herbalist mother and the tradition of healing.

Homeless after the expulsion of Jews from her village and removed to the city of Troyes for safety, Julietta is separated from her mother to become a ward of master physician Brion. Female and therefore banned from seeking knowledge, Julietta seeks solace in restoring Brion’s tangled, weed-filled garden. How unlike her mother’s it is! Mother’s was filled with healing herbs and color. With each herb Julietta plants, she consults her mother’s herbal notebook and discovers the herb's ability to heal. Filled with compassion for the sick and suffering, naturally intelligent Julietta learns by patience and discovery. She works with stems, leaves, berries, and flowers. She begins to create remedies. She yearns to be allowed into Master Brion’s blue-tiled special study room. She wants to learn, to apprentice.

Spirited, compassionate, and inquisitive, Julietta soon must confront the usual anti-feminist obstacles and more—a skeptical mentor, a jealous rival, and her own self-doubt—to achieve her dream of becoming a doctor.

The novel offers young readers a glimpse of a fascinating but obscure era in Jewish history: the Middle Ages, with its customs, ethos, and folk beliefs. It also explores a little-known facet of medieval life—the daring participation of women in the field of medicine. In so doing, the story highlights women’s historical journey, from herbalists to doctors’ assistants to physicians in their own right.

"Julietta, a novel about a young Jewish girl in the 1200s, is our current read-aloud for the evenings. It is providing our fifth grader (and our third graders) with an excellent grasp of concepts she is reading about in the Kingfisher Illustrated Encyclopedia used in History Odyssey, Level Two: Middle Ages. It is giving faces, names, characterization, personalization, and heart to a time in history where there is little supplemental fictional material to be found—the persecution of Jews in the Middle Ages." – Mariann A., homeschooling parent, Oakton, VA

Author Myra Saturen is the author of Journey to a New World, also published by Royal Fireworks Press.

Troyes, France, 1283. Among medieval physicians, a courageous few were women. They faced popular prejudice and furious opposition to their participation in the medical field. Yet fourteen-year-old Julietta’s dream had always been to dare to follow in the footsteps of her herbalist mother and the tradition of healing.

Homeless after the expulsion of Jews from her village and removed to the city of Troyes for safety, Julietta is separated from her mother to become a ward of master physician Brion. Female and therefore banned from seeking knowledge, Julietta seeks solace in restoring Brion’s tangled, weed-filled garden. How unlike her mother’s it is! Mother’s was filled with healing herbs and color. With each herb Julietta plants, she consults her mother’s herbal notebook and discovers the herb's ability to heal. Filled with compassion for the sick and suffering, naturally intelligent Julietta learns by patience and discovery. She works with stems, leaves, berries, and flowers. She begins to create remedies. She yearns to be allowed into Master Brion’s blue-tiled special study room. She wants to learn, to apprentice.

Spirited, compassionate, and inquisitive, Julietta soon must confront the usual anti-feminist obstacles and more—a skeptical mentor, a jealous rival, and her own self-doubt—to achieve her dream of becoming a doctor.

The novel offers young readers a glimpse of a fascinating but obscure era in Jewish history: the Middle Ages, with its customs, ethos, and folk beliefs. It also explores a little-known facet of medieval life—the daring participation of women in the field of medicine. In so doing, the story highlights women’s historical journey, from herbalists to doctors’ assistants to physicians in their own right.

"Julietta, a novel about a young Jewish girl in the 1200s, is our current read-aloud for the evenings. It is providing our fifth grader (and our third graders) with an excellent grasp of concepts she is reading about in the Kingfisher Illustrated Encyclopedia used in History Odyssey, Level Two: Middle Ages. It is giving faces, names, characterization, personalization, and heart to a time in history where there is little supplemental fictional material to be found—the persecution of Jews in the Middle Ages." – Mariann A., homeschooling parent, Oakton, VA

Author Myra Saturen is the author of Journey to a New World, also published by Royal Fireworks Press.

Julietta Cover

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