Novels about Gifted Children: Novels Set in the Modern Era

The novels in this list feature gifted characters living in the modern era, enabling gifted children to discover and follow bright, precocious protagonists who encounter situations and experiences that are timely and relevant.

The novels in this list feature gifted characters living in the modern era, enabling gifted children to discover and follow bright, precocious protagonists who encounter situations and experiences that are timely and relevant.

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The Glimpsing Book

Author: Loe, Steve

Subjects: Fantasy; Imagination

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

ISBN: 978-0-88092-594-5

Order code: 5945

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 5945S

The Glimpsing Book Cover

"This is a terrifically entertaining read from start to finish and highly recommended for school and community library fantasy fiction collections." – Midwest Book Review

"...imagination, fantasy, and uniquely interwoven plots keep the reader turning pages..." – KNEA Reading Circle

The Glimpsing Book celebrates reading, imagination, and the human potential for good. Read it if you’re a kid; read it to your kids if you’re an adult, and believe in the impossible maybe.” – Lois Ruby, children’s and young adult author

"The book is so structured that readers will find the journey throughout the various plots so compelling they simply will not put the book down." – Dr. John H. Bushman, author, educator, and director of The Writing Conference, Inc.

Steve Loe’s first novel highlights the power of imagination in young people. A strange new librarian and a cryptic book collide in the lives of two pre-teens as they embark on a journey far beyond the back of the library. TP Burton and Henrietta Harper discover that reading, like life, is not a spectator sport, and the power of a great story has the magic to make the seemingly impossible possible.

On the other hand, Sebastian Wey believes only in logical explanations. When he uncovers several historical photographs that hold clues to the mysterious book, his reasonable world smashes directly into Henrietta, a reclusive twelve-year-old mourning the premature death of her mother. Henrietta deals with her loss by hiding in the back of the library, where the pain of reality melts away as she loses herself in the fascinating realm of fantasy novels.

With the power of a megaton magnet, the baffling text draws the two strangers together, challenging Sebastian’s logical mind as they begin to understand that the mystical manuscript changes each time it is read. Eventually they grasp that the book’s living storyline offers each reader glimpses into his or her future.

Author Steve Loe says of his intentions for The Glimpsing Book:It is my hope that because of the differences among the three main characters—a lonely girl who loves to read, a strong-willed graffiti artist, and an analytical boy who can solve any puzzle—anyone with a love of magic and mystery will enjoy reading The Glimpsing Book.  He is also the author of The Hot Hurry of Mecurial Fleeting.

"This is a terrifically entertaining read from start to finish and highly recommended for school and community library fantasy fiction collections." – Midwest Book Review

"...imagination, fantasy, and uniquely interwoven plots keep the reader turning pages..." – KNEA Reading Circle

The Glimpsing Book celebrates reading, imagination, and the human potential for good. Read it if you’re a kid; read it to your kids if you’re an adult, and believe in the impossible maybe.” – Lois Ruby, children’s and young adult author

"The book is so structured that readers will find the journey throughout the various plots so compelling they simply will not put the book down." – Dr. John H. Bushman, author, educator, and director of The Writing Conference, Inc.

Steve Loe’s first novel highlights the power of imagination in young people. A strange new librarian and a cryptic book collide in the lives of two pre-teens as they embark on a journey far beyond the back of the library. TP Burton and Henrietta Harper discover that reading, like life, is not a spectator sport, and the power of a great story has the magic to make the seemingly impossible possible.

On the other hand, Sebastian Wey believes only in logical explanations. When he uncovers several historical photographs that hold clues to the mysterious book, his reasonable world smashes directly into Henrietta, a reclusive twelve-year-old mourning the premature death of her mother. Henrietta deals with her loss by hiding in the back of the library, where the pain of reality melts away as she loses herself in the fascinating realm of fantasy novels.

With the power of a megaton magnet, the baffling text draws the two strangers together, challenging Sebastian’s logical mind as they begin to understand that the mystical manuscript changes each time it is read. Eventually they grasp that the book’s living storyline offers each reader glimpses into his or her future.

Author Steve Loe says of his intentions for The Glimpsing Book:It is my hope that because of the differences among the three main characters—a lonely girl who loves to read, a strong-willed graffiti artist, and an analytical boy who can solve any puzzle—anyone with a love of magic and mystery will enjoy reading The Glimpsing Book.  He is also the author of The Hot Hurry of Mecurial Fleeting.

The Glimpsing Book Cover

The Glimpsing Book sample pages:

Dream On, Charlie!

Author: Stutler, Susan Lee

Subjects: Guidance; School Experience; Growing Up Gifted

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11

Grade: 3, 4, 5

Order code: 5078

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 5078S

Dream On, Charlie! Cover

Fourth grader Charlie Osgood is a daydreamer in class and is not working up to his potential. A discussion with his teacher, Mrs. Polatski, reveals that he is bored doing the same things repeatedly. Once he’s mastered the basic knowledge or techniques, his mind wanders creatively.

Charlie imagines himself as a secret agent or an action hero involved in missions at sea, on land, and in the air. He shares some of his ideas with his classmates, who appreciate his wild, unbridled imagination. One boy, Andy, is jealous of Charlie’s popularity and vows to make him look bad by any means possible. When Mrs. Polatski tells the class that they have a chance to spend three days at Camp Indian Head if they can raise the money for the trip and asks the students to think of ways to raise money, Charlie is turned on. He listens to his classmates suggest the usual car wash and bake sale. Then he excites them with his plans for a Christmas store.

As Christmas approaches, supplies for the project—called “Santa’s Workshop”—line the classroom walls. But Andy has been smuggling out little toys and other sales items for days. He plans to return them after the failure of Charlie’s project. A week into the sale, Charlie estimates that even if they sell all their merchandise, the kids will still come up short of their goal, but he can't figure out why. Finally guilt-ridden Andy confesses his misdeeds, after the bully Tyler Stubbs tells Andy that he is not getting beaten up only because Charlie has interceded. With the stock back and one final marketing push by all the children selling together, the kids reach their goal, and Andy is back in the gang for holiday fun.

After vacation, the class returns to find exciting changes in their classroom, including a hands-on science center. Loving the change, Charlie believes that he too can change—that he can stop daydreaming and stay on task. He might even win an award. He can picture it now....

Fourth grader Charlie Osgood is a daydreamer in class and is not working up to his potential. A discussion with his teacher, Mrs. Polatski, reveals that he is bored doing the same things repeatedly. Once he’s mastered the basic knowledge or techniques, his mind wanders creatively.

Charlie imagines himself as a secret agent or an action hero involved in missions at sea, on land, and in the air. He shares some of his ideas with his classmates, who appreciate his wild, unbridled imagination. One boy, Andy, is jealous of Charlie’s popularity and vows to make him look bad by any means possible. When Mrs. Polatski tells the class that they have a chance to spend three days at Camp Indian Head if they can raise the money for the trip and asks the students to think of ways to raise money, Charlie is turned on. He listens to his classmates suggest the usual car wash and bake sale. Then he excites them with his plans for a Christmas store.

As Christmas approaches, supplies for the project—called “Santa’s Workshop”—line the classroom walls. But Andy has been smuggling out little toys and other sales items for days. He plans to return them after the failure of Charlie’s project. A week into the sale, Charlie estimates that even if they sell all their merchandise, the kids will still come up short of their goal, but he can't figure out why. Finally guilt-ridden Andy confesses his misdeeds, after the bully Tyler Stubbs tells Andy that he is not getting beaten up only because Charlie has interceded. With the stock back and one final marketing push by all the children selling together, the kids reach their goal, and Andy is back in the gang for holiday fun.

After vacation, the class returns to find exciting changes in their classroom, including a hands-on science center. Loving the change, Charlie believes that he too can change—that he can stop daydreaming and stay on task. He might even win an award. He can picture it now....

Dream On, Charlie! Cover

If I Touched an Eagle

Author: Stamm, Joan

Subjects: Environmental Science; Birds; Eagles; Native Americans; Animal Story

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6

Order code: 0645

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 0645S

If I Touched an Eagle Cover

Kodiak Island, Alaska. Fifth graders Emily and David have become best friends. Emily, born on Kodiak, is a Native American. David’s family has recently come from Detroit to the purity of the Alaskan wilderness, fleeing the pollution they believe caused David’s leukemia, which is now in remission. Emily wants to be a marine wildlife biologist and is a hands-on animal lover. David is a student of books and a birdwatcher. He wants to be an ornithologist. Together they explore the Kodiak beaches and find a dead eagle, which they bring to school for an autopsy in science class. Later they discover an eagle’s nest on the side of a cliff. With cliff-climbing bravery and a hope that the parent eagles will accept them if they remain calm and courteous, Emily and David visit the nest.

When Emily’s mother, a scientist, makes a business trip to Valdez, Emily accompanies her. They are caught in rough weather that later puts an oil tanker off course and onto the reefs. It spills 138,000 barrels of oil into the sea. As part of the Coast Guard scout team, Emily becomes aware that an entire generation of fish will be lost, that the fishing industry is in peril, and that nature’s food chain is now poisoned. Who is to blame? The oil company? The consumers who buy oil for traveling, heating, and cooking? One solution seems to be to develop solar energy while conserving what we currently use.

As the oil slick spreads, Emily’s grandmother is evacuated to Kodiak. She tells Emily the lore of creation and the place of the eagle as the soul of man. Grandmother is sensitive to all animals and intuitively knows the nature of David’s illness. Not until he collapses does Emily realize that he really is sick. She gives him a wishing stone and a “secret” eagle feather to take with him to the hospital.

Emily resolves to bring the eagles from the nest on the cilff untainted salmon from the cannery—even if she has to steal it—until the eaglets leave the nest and the parents follow. In a dramatic closing scene, David has just returned from the hospital. The two children are off to feed the eagles, but the oil slick has hit the beach. Emily and David struggle in the goo, fearing the worst. Happily, the young eagles have gone, and the parents are ready to follow. With a swoop to retrieve a final cannery salmon from their friends, the eagles fly off.

If I Touched an Eagle includes beautiful, almost poetic passages from the point of view of the eagle.

Kodiak Island, Alaska. Fifth graders Emily and David have become best friends. Emily, born on Kodiak, is a Native American. David’s family has recently come from Detroit to the purity of the Alaskan wilderness, fleeing the pollution they believe caused David’s leukemia, which is now in remission. Emily wants to be a marine wildlife biologist and is a hands-on animal lover. David is a student of books and a birdwatcher. He wants to be an ornithologist. Together they explore the Kodiak beaches and find a dead eagle, which they bring to school for an autopsy in science class. Later they discover an eagle’s nest on the side of a cliff. With cliff-climbing bravery and a hope that the parent eagles will accept them if they remain calm and courteous, Emily and David visit the nest.

When Emily’s mother, a scientist, makes a business trip to Valdez, Emily accompanies her. They are caught in rough weather that later puts an oil tanker off course and onto the reefs. It spills 138,000 barrels of oil into the sea. As part of the Coast Guard scout team, Emily becomes aware that an entire generation of fish will be lost, that the fishing industry is in peril, and that nature’s food chain is now poisoned. Who is to blame? The oil company? The consumers who buy oil for traveling, heating, and cooking? One solution seems to be to develop solar energy while conserving what we currently use.

As the oil slick spreads, Emily’s grandmother is evacuated to Kodiak. She tells Emily the lore of creation and the place of the eagle as the soul of man. Grandmother is sensitive to all animals and intuitively knows the nature of David’s illness. Not until he collapses does Emily realize that he really is sick. She gives him a wishing stone and a “secret” eagle feather to take with him to the hospital.

Emily resolves to bring the eagles from the nest on the cilff untainted salmon from the cannery—even if she has to steal it—until the eaglets leave the nest and the parents follow. In a dramatic closing scene, David has just returned from the hospital. The two children are off to feed the eagles, but the oil slick has hit the beach. Emily and David struggle in the goo, fearing the worst. Happily, the young eagles have gone, and the parents are ready to follow. With a swoop to retrieve a final cannery salmon from their friends, the eagles fly off.

If I Touched an Eagle includes beautiful, almost poetic passages from the point of view of the eagle.

If I Touched an Eagle Cover

Goodbye, Tchaikovsky

Author: Thal, Michael

Subjects: School Experience; Disabilities; Deafness; Twice-Exceptionality

Age: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

Grade: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Pages: 136

ISBN: 978-0-88092-469-6

Order code: 4696

Price: $15.00
Website price: $10.00

Goodbye, Tchaikovsky Cover

2nd Place, Royal Dragonfly Book Awards, Young Adult Fiction
Honorable Mention, Paris Book Festival
Honorable Mention, Hollywood Book Festival

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall and gets rave reviews that attract the attention of the Queen of England. His future as a musician lies brilliantly before him. Then one morning, David wakes up to discover that he has sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world and forcing him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Written from David's perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with what he perceives as a devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school? How does he deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up in the hearing world; as a child, he played the violin and went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. But as an adult, one day he woke up to deafness, the result of a virus. The virus attacked again six years later, causing him to lose his hearing entirely in his right ear and leaving him with 65% hearing loss in his left. He says, "I can understand people one on one but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth-grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed."

Reviews:

"Told in first-person perspective, Goodbye, Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended." – Midwest Book Review

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf worlds. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself." – Bergers Book Reviews

"Michael Thal’s Goodbye, Tchiakovsky is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss. Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person. I was delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (nonverbally) from storybooks with a deaf preschooler who was learning English. The book reminds readers of the importance of literacy for all deaf children." – Jamie Perlman, Orange County Deaf Literacy Project
 
"This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of sixteen, it would have given me hope, comfort, and inspiration. I would recommend
 this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or another disability." – Valerie Stern, LCSW, psychotherapist, Los Angeles 

"Goodbye, Tchaikovsky is thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David, struggles through this life upheaval." – Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

"I really liked this book. Simple statement of fact: I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable, as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David—just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. For kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all." – Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor

"Goodbye, Tchaikovsky by Michael L. Thal is a wonderful and moving tale of music, hearing loss, and of course, goodbyes. A 12-year-old male violinist wakes to find that everything is silent. He’s prescribed pills to help. Nothing. He is forced to go to a school for the deaf, where he learns sign language, with the help of his uncle, makes friends, and practices for his bar mitzvah. David, like many people, feels stuck. While he wants to hang out with his hearing friends, it's hard to understand them, for they talk too fast and get too restless speaking slowly. His deaf friends sign too fast. He feels he can't fit in in either world. The author, Michal Thal, is also deaf and therefore can relate to David’s struggles, which makes the story more realistic. If you have a lot of empathy, you will have a lot of cries. If you have a sense of humor, you will have a lot of laughs. If you don't even like books, you will love this, I guarantee!"Bryce, 10-year-old reader

2nd Place, Royal Dragonfly Book Awards, Young Adult Fiction
Honorable Mention, Paris Book Festival
Honorable Mention, Hollywood Book Festival

A twelve-year-old violin virtuoso, David Rothman is an overnight success. He performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in New York’s Symphony Hall and gets rave reviews that attract the attention of the Queen of England. His future as a musician lies brilliantly before him. Then one morning, David wakes up to discover that he has sudden and irreparable hearing loss, plunging him into a silent world and forcing him to adapt to a new culture and language in order to survive. Written from David's perspective, the novel shows how an adolescent boy sets about coping with what he perceives as a devastating new condition. It takes time. How will he communicate with his friends? What can he do about school? How does he deal with unexpected and possibly dangerous situations? What will his future be like?

Michael Thal grew up in the hearing world; as a child, he played the violin and went to concerts, movies, and Broadway shows. But as an adult, one day he woke up to deafness, the result of a virus. The virus attacked again six years later, causing him to lose his hearing entirely in his right ear and leaving him with 65% hearing loss in his left. He says, "I can understand people one on one but not in groups. At the age of forty-four, severe hearing loss took me away from my job as a sixth-grade teacher. From that experience, I was inspired to write this story. If a person has a willingness to learn and an open mind to explore all possibilities, he can find a way to succeed."

Reviews:

"Told in first-person perspective, Goodbye, Tchaikovsky is a story of courage, adaptation, and the struggle to accept a new way of life. Highly recommended." – Midwest Book Review

"...a touching portrayal of a boy who just wants to fit in but finds himself pulled between the hearing and the deaf worlds. Ultimately, what he really needs to find is himself." – Bergers Book Reviews

"Michael Thal’s Goodbye, Tchiakovsky is a great read for entry-level awareness about people with varying degrees of hearing loss. Thal writes about familiar characters that I associate with from my own colorful reality as a deaf person. I was delighted that the main character, David, advanced his visual language skills; he practiced reading (nonverbally) from storybooks with a deaf preschooler who was learning English. The book reminds readers of the importance of literacy for all deaf children." – Jamie Perlman, Orange County Deaf Literacy Project
 
"This book would be an eye-opener for hearing people. As for me, if I had the chance to read it when I began losing my hearing at the age of sixteen, it would have given me hope, comfort, and inspiration. I would recommend
 this book to any young adult or teenager who is going through hearing loss or another disability." – Valerie Stern, LCSW, psychotherapist, Los Angeles 

"Goodbye, Tchaikovsky is thoroughly enjoyable and easy to read. Although the book is written for a young audience, I thought of several people I know who would really benefit from the emotional release the story provides. I loved all the characters and the uplifting tone as the main character, David, struggles through this life upheaval." – Jan Seeley, Temple Beth Solomon for the Deaf

"I really liked this book. Simple statement of fact: I don’t know Michael Thal, but I do now know more about deafness and how folks with hearing loss get through a day. I ached for David as he faced new school situations, signing, the loss of his music, and growing up in an entirely different way than he’d ever imagined. But central to my experience as a writer for kids of all ages was how universal Thal made his character’s experience. David is deaf, but he’s so relatable, as we all remember the terror of starting a new school, the pain of losing a friend, the sweetness of a first love, and the ‘oops’ things we all do growing up. How do any of us survive? We do it like David—just by hanging in there, being willing to try something different, and listening even when you can’t hear. For kids or adults, this is an appealing book for all." – Gail Hedrick, former teacher, freelance writer, and editor

"Goodbye, Tchaikovsky by Michael L. Thal is a wonderful and moving tale of music, hearing loss, and of course, goodbyes. A 12-year-old male violinist wakes to find that everything is silent. He’s prescribed pills to help. Nothing. He is forced to go to a school for the deaf, where he learns sign language, with the help of his uncle, makes friends, and practices for his bar mitzvah. David, like many people, feels stuck. While he wants to hang out with his hearing friends, it's hard to understand them, for they talk too fast and get too restless speaking slowly. His deaf friends sign too fast. He feels he can't fit in in either world. The author, Michal Thal, is also deaf and therefore can relate to David’s struggles, which makes the story more realistic. If you have a lot of empathy, you will have a lot of cries. If you have a sense of humor, you will have a lot of laughs. If you don't even like books, you will love this, I guarantee!"Bryce, 10-year-old reader

Goodbye, Tchaikovsky Cover

Goodbye, Tchaikovsky Sample Pages:

His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project

Author: Mull, David Kenneth

Subjects: School Experience; Bullying

Age: 12, 13, 14, 15

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9

ISBN: 978-0-89824-371-0

Order code: 3710

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 3710S

His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project Cover

"The power of science is not to be underestimated. His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a story of school and Gilbert O'Shay, a science nerd who comes to the dance with a beautiful girl on his arm. The rumor mill sparks up, as the truth is slow to come out, in this story of Gilbert's friend, Charlie Cliché. His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a fine read not to be overlooked for younger readers." – Midwest Book Review

"It is the kind of book that I couldn't guess the ending of. It also shows how mean people can be but I like that he is happy, although he still wants revenge. A very funny book." – Rosie, age 12

His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a comedy/adventure tale about Gilbert O’Shay, who is a genius but is so inept in social skills that he has to use science to create a date for his school dance. Or so it would seem. Gilbert O’Shay is mercilessly persecuted for his eccentric appearance and character, but Charlie discovers his secret—and his hilarious project for getting even with the bullies. The school is agog with rumor, the denouement suitably satisfying.

"So much of being bullied stems from not being able to take control of the situation, and students feel helpless and frustrated. In a book like this, students begin to realize there are options and solutions, but they must be a part of that process. There is more than one way to take control, and often humor is the ‘the best medicine.’ This is a book about kids and for kids in today’s world, where we all need ‘a little help from our friends.’" – Robert Bier, reading specialist with 33 years of teaching experience

The author says: “The purpose of the novel is to encourage boys and girls, from upper elementary grades through high school, to read. There is also a thread of values that runs through all my books. They deal with acceptance, tolerance, and open-mindedness, on many levels.”

"The power of science is not to be underestimated. His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a story of school and Gilbert O'Shay, a science nerd who comes to the dance with a beautiful girl on his arm. The rumor mill sparks up, as the truth is slow to come out, in this story of Gilbert's friend, Charlie Cliché. His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a fine read not to be overlooked for younger readers." – Midwest Book Review 

"It is the kind of book that I couldn't guess the ending of. It also shows how mean people can be but I like that he is happy, although he still wants revenge. A very funny book." – Rosie, age 12

His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project is a comedy/adventure tale about Gilbert O’Shay, who is a genius but is so inept in social skills that he has to use science to create a date for his school dance. Or so it would seem. Gilbert O’Shay is mercilessly persecuted for his eccentric appearance and character, but Charlie discovers his secret—and his hilarious project for getting even with the bullies. The school is agog with rumor, the denouement suitably satisfying.

"So much of being bullied stems from not being able to take control of the situation, and students feel helpless and frustrated. In a book like this, students begin to realize there are options and solutions, but they must be a part of that process. There is more than one way to take control, and often humor is the ‘the best medicine.’ This is a book about kids and for kids in today’s world, where we all need ‘a little help from our friends.’" – Robert Bier, reading specialist with 33 years of teaching experience

The author says: “The purpose of the novel is to encourage boys and girls, from upper elementary grades through high school, to read. There is also a thread of values that runs through all my books. They deal with acceptance, tolerance, and open-mindedness, on many levels.”

His Date for the Dance Was His Science Project Cover

His Date for the Dance Sample Pages:

The Valedictorian

Author: Tchudi, Steven

Subjects: Guidance; School Experience; Emotional Needs; Twice-Exceptionality; Gifted Women and Girls; Growing Up Gifted

Age: 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Order code: 4489

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 4489S

The Valedictorian Cover

Freshman Jennifer Bond was making good grades, applying herself, and enjoying success. She was happy…until Ms. Hart, her algebra teacher, summoned her to a talk about holding back in class, suppressing her ability in order to have a social life, and being a female in a man’s world. After flipping through Jennifer’s records as they spoke, Ms. Hart pronounced that Jennifer was good enough to make a run for valedictorian. Her grades and standardized test data put her among the top in the school, and she could overcome the advantages that those with higher IQs had simply by working harder. Once Jennifer buys into the valedictorian quest with gusto, a workaholic history professor, Dr. Gilman, helps feed into her need to “do more.” Overly influenced by his philosophy and studying the warring nature of countries, her competitiveness and skewed attitude toward people is augmented. The National Honor Society is a service club, but to Jennifer it becomes an assemblage of the enemy around her.

Slowly, like a junkie, Jennifer craves to do more and more homework and extra work that eats away at the social aspects of her life. She loses touch with her friends, breaks up with her boyfriend, becomes jealous of classmates who grasp things easily and produce seemingly effortlessly, and begins to see other smart kids as adversaries to be on guard against—even to plot against. She “sneaks” homework behind her concerned parents’ backs. The need for perfection becomes overwhelming, the situation critical. But an experienced female high school guidance counselor is there to step in with effective, nurturing, long-term help. In her senior year, Jennifer makes it back to the real world of responsibility and commitment, balanced with the fun of living a “normal” teenager’s life.

Jennifer tells her story in flashback, divided by her years in high school. There have been many stories about underachievers, their psychological pressures, their successes, and their failings. Jennifer’s story is different; it is about motivation from another angle. Hers is a story about a teenager possessed by the idea of overachieving.

Steven Tchudi has authored about 50 books for the general public, for teachers, and for young adult readers. A past-president of the National Council of Teachers of English and a former editor of The English Journal, he is also past-president of the Michigan and Nevada Councils of English Teachers. He resides in Reno, Nevada.

Freshman Jennifer Bond was making good grades, applying herself, and enjoying success. She was happy…until Ms. Hart, her algebra teacher, summoned her to a talk about holding back in class, suppressing her ability in order to have a social life, and being a female in a man’s world. After flipping through Jennifer’s records as they spoke, Ms. Hart pronounced that Jennifer was good enough to make a run for valedictorian. Her grades and standardized test data put her among the top in the school, and she could overcome the advantages that those with higher IQs had simply by working harder. Once Jennifer buys into the valedictorian quest with gusto, a workaholic history professor, Dr. Gilman, helps feed into her need to “do more.” Overly influenced by his philosophy and studying the warring nature of countries, her competitiveness and skewed attitude toward people is augmented. The National Honor Society is a service club, but to Jennifer it becomes an assemblage of the enemy around her.

Slowly, like a junkie, Jennifer craves to do more and more homework and extra work that eats away at the social aspects of her life. She loses touch with her friends, breaks up with her boyfriend, becomes jealous of classmates who grasp things easily and produce seemingly effortlessly, and begins to see other smart kids as adversaries to be on guard against—even to plot against. She “sneaks” homework behind her concerned parents’ backs. The need for perfection becomes overwhelming, the situation critical. But an experienced female high school guidance counselor is there to step in with effective, nurturing, long-term help. In her senior year, Jennifer makes it back to the real world of responsibility and commitment, balanced with the fun of living a “normal” teenager’s life.

Jennifer tells her story in flashback, divided by her years in high school. There have been many stories about underachievers, their psychological pressures, their successes, and their failings. Jennifer’s story is different; it is about motivation from another angle. Hers is a story about a teenager possessed by the idea of overachieving.

Steven Tchudi has authored about 50 books for the general public, for teachers, and for young adult readers. A past-president of the National Council of Teachers of English and a former editor of The English Journal, he is also past-president of the Michigan and Nevada Councils of English Teachers. He resides in Reno, Nevada.

The Valedictorian Cover

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