Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series

Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series Series Cover

A Special Series of Books for Children Who Struggle to Read

Even before the Europeans were able to travel across the New World from the Atlantic to the Pacific, before they explored the vast landscape that made up what would become the United States of America, before they knew what kind of terrain lay before them as they pushed west, they understood the significance of the huge river that snaked across their path: the Mighty Mississippi. The Mississippi River watershed is one of the largest in the world, covering more than a million square miles of what is generally rich and fertile soil—ideal for planting crops or raising animals. Early explorers understood that both the river and the land around it carried tremendous value for whichever nation could claim them.

It was with this motivation in mind that Robert Cavelier de La Salle, along with his trusted friend Henri de Tonti, set out to build a chain of forts along the Mississippi River in the Illinois Country, an area that was comprised primarily of the upper Mississippi River watershed, especially the present states of Illinois and Missouri. His dream was to create a lucrative fur-trading business for France in what he hoped would soon be the nation of New France. Alas, dreams do not always come true, and as hard as La Salle and Tonti worked toward the realization of theirs, adversity met them head on in various forms at every pass. They did build their forts, but they did not keep them, and New France never came to be.

The British were next, ousting the French from their forts, despite the unwavering resistance of Chief Pontiac of the Native American tribe of Ottawas, who worked relentlessly to keep the newcomers from taking over his people's lands. And finally came George Rogers Clark, who took the forts from the British on behalf of the newly formed United States.

Everyone wanted the land, and while it now seems inevitable that the United States should have won it from foreign influence (a claim that Pontiac would certainly argue against as faulty even in its premise), nothing, in fact, was inevitable. The European countries were jockeying for control over the glorious new land of wealth and abundance they had discovered, and without the determination and steadfast resolution of the men who shaped the history of the U.S. between the East Coast and the Great River, things may have gone entirely differently.

These books are printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that makes them easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. A special feature of the books is that each two-page spread contains a QR code that links to audio of the book being narrated. Children can listen and follow along to help them learn the words that they are seeing.

The Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series offers a way for children with reading difficulties to enjoy reading and American history in a rare and wonderfully accessible combination that they will treasure for years to come.

Note: Although each title is meant to be a standalone book, important terms are defined or explained in the first book in which they appear, and the stories build upon one another, making the reading of the books in chronological order a more rewarding experience for children who are new to the topic.

To view all of the Adventures on the American Frontier dyslexia series, click here.

To view a standard-font edition of the stories in this series presented together as a single biographical novel without the audio feature, click here.

A Special Series of Books for Children Who Struggle to Read

Even before the Europeans were able to travel across the New World from the Atlantic to the Pacific, before they explored the vast landscape that made up what would become the United States of America, before they knew what kind of terrain lay before them as they pushed west, they understood the significance of the huge river that snaked across their path: the Mighty Mississippi. The Mississippi River watershed is one of the largest in the world, covering more than a million square miles of what is generally rich and fertile soil—ideal for planting crops or raising animals. Early explorers understood that both the river and the land around it carried tremendous value for whichever nation could claim them.

It was with this motivation in mind that Robert Cavelier de La Salle, along with his trusted friend Henri de Tonti, set out to build a chain of forts along the Mississippi River in the Illinois Country, an area that was comprised primarily of the upper Mississippi River watershed, especially the present states of Illinois and Missouri. His dream was to create a lucrative fur-trading business for France in what he hoped would soon be the nation of New France. Alas, dreams do not always come true, and as hard as La Salle and Tonti worked toward the realization of theirs, adversity met them head on in various forms at every pass. They did build their forts, but they did not keep them, and New France never came to be.

The British were next, ousting the French from their forts, despite the unwavering resistance of Chief Pontiac of the Native American tribe of Ottawas, who worked relentlessly to keep the newcomers from taking over his people's lands. And finally came George Rogers Clark, who took the forts from the British on behalf of the newly formed United States.

Everyone wanted the land, and while it now seems inevitable that the United States should have won it from foreign influence (a claim that Pontiac would certainly argue against as faulty even in its premise), nothing, in fact, was inevitable. The European countries were jockeying for control over the glorious new land of wealth and abundance they had discovered, and without the determination and steadfast resolution of the men who shaped the history of the U.S. between the East Coast and the Great River, things may have gone entirely differently.

These books are printed in a special dyslexia-friendly font that makes them easier for some children with visual processing problems to read. A special feature of the books is that each two-page spread contains a QR code that links to audio of the book being narrated. Children can listen and follow along to help them learn the words that they are seeing.

The Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series offers a way for children with reading difficulties to enjoy reading and American history in a rare and wonderfully accessible combination that they will treasure for years to come.

Note: Although each title is meant to be a standalone book, important terms are defined or explained in the first book in which they appear, and the stories build upon one another, making the reading of the books in chronological order a more rewarding experience for children who are new to the topic.

To view all of the Adventures on the American Frontier dyslexia series, click here.

To view a standard-font edition of the stories in this series presented together as a single biographical novel without the audio feature, click here.

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La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country

Subtitle: Resolute Men of the Illinois Country, Part One

Author: A Royal Fireworks Press Publication; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator and Narrator)

Subjects: Exploration; Dyslexia-Friendly Books; Early America; Colonization

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 125

ISBN: 978-0-88092-945-5

Order code: 9455

Price: $20.00
Website price: $15.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $12.00 each.
Order code: 9455S

La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country Cover

Robert Cavelier de La Salle dreamed of building a chain of fur-trading forts across the Illinois Country—a vast region primarily encompassing what is now Illinois and Missouri—culminating in a seaport at the mouth of the Mississippi River. La Salle was a talented leader, explorer, and negotiator with the local Native American tribes, and with his faithful friend Henri de Tonti, he pressed on resolutely against ongoing hardship and misfortune in his effort to establish New France for the glory of his home country.

Robert Cavelier de La Salle dreamed of building a chain of fur-trading forts across the Illinois Country—a vast region primarily encompassing what is now Illinois and Missouri—culminating in a seaport at the mouth of the Mississippi River. La Salle was a talented leader, explorer, and negotiator with the local Native American tribes, and with his faithful friend Henri de Tonti, he pressed on resolutely against ongoing hardship and misfortune in his effort to establish New France for the glory of his home country.

La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country Cover

La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country sample pages:

Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country

Subtitle: Resolute Men of the Illinois Country, Part Two

Author: A Royal Fireworks Press Publication; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator and Narrator)

Subjects: Exploration; Dyslexia-Friendly Books; Early America; Colonization

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 49

ISBN: 978-0-89824-946-0

Order code: 9460

Price: $17.00
Website price: $10.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $7.00 each.
Order code: 9460S

Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country Cover

By the mid-1700s, European countries were warring with one another to claim the New World as their own. They did not consider that it was not theirs to fight over. With every acre plowed or clear-cut, with every treaty broken, Native Americans saw their traditional way of life coming to a disastrous end. Chief Pontiac of the Ottawas refused to accept that end, and he resolved to do everything he could to save the land for the native tribes that had been stewards of the region for generations. He was one of the most inspirational leaders of his time.

By the mid-1700s, European countries were warring with one another to claim the New World as their own. They did not consider that it was not theirs to fight over. With every acre plowed or clear-cut, with every treaty broken, Native Americans saw their traditional way of life coming to a disastrous end. Chief Pontiac of the Ottawas refused to accept that end, and he resolved to do everything he could to save the land for the native tribes that had been stewards of the region for generations. He was one of the most inspirational leaders of his time.

Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country Cover

Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country sample pages:

George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America

Subtitle: Resolute Men of the Illinois Country, Part Three

Author: A Royal Fireworks Press Publication; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator and Narrator)

Subjects: Exploration; Dyslexia-Friendly Books; Early America; Colonization

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Pages: 77

ISBN: 978-0-88092-946-2

Order code: 9462

Price: $20.00
Website price: $15.00

Class sets: 10 or more: $12.00 each.
Order code: 9462S

George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America Cover

When the American colonies declared their independence from England, they had a war on their hands, and men were called to serve all along the East Coast to fight the British. But George Rogers Clark knew that the British weren't only along the Eastern Seaboard; they occupied the old French forts in the Illinois Country as well. So while the colonists' attention was in the East, George turned his attention west, and with a group of intrepid frontiersmen, he outsmarted the enemy and won the heartland of America for the United States.

When the American colonies declared their independence from England, they had a war on their hands, and men were called to serve all along the East Coast to fight the British. But George Rogers Clark knew that the British weren't only along the Eastern Seaboard; they occupied the old French forts in the Illinois Country as well. So while the colonists' attention was in the East, George turned his attention west, and with a group of intrepid frontiersmen, he outsmarted the enemy and won the heartland of America for the United States.

George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America Cover

George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America sample pages:

Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series Set

Author: A Royal Fireworks Press Publication; Tice, Christopher (Illustrator and Narrator)

Subjects: Exploration; Dyslexia-Friendly Books; Early America; Colonization

Age: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Grade: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Order code: 9455SET

Price: $35.00
Website price: $30.00

Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series Set Cover

This set includes all three books in the series: La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country, Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country, and George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America, all offered together at a reduced price.

This set includes all three books in the series: La Salle and Tonti Build Forts in the Illinois Country, Chief Pontiac Fights for the Illinois Country, and George Rogers Clark Fights the British for America, all offered together at a reduced price.

Resolute Men of the Illinois Country Dyslexia Series Set Cover

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