The Eyes of the Enemy

Author: Black, Robert

Subjects: World War II; Historical Fiction

Age: 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Grade: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

ISBN: 978-0-89824-323-9

Order code: 3239

Price: $14.99
Website price: $10.00

Also an iBook from iTunes

The Eyes of the Enemy Cover

 Praise for Black’s books: “Very highly recommended… quite special and unique approach to storytelling.” – Midwest Book Review

An original, deftly crafted, inherently absorbing and thoroughly entertaining read for children ages 11 to 15, “The Eyes of the Enemy” by Robert Black is unreservedly recommended for personal reading lists, as well as school and community library Historical Fiction collections for young readers.”  – Children’s Bookwatch

It is 1944, and the war between the United States and Japan rages across the Pacific. Back in Nebraska, Kathy Syverson has been having unusual dreams—very unusual dreams. She sees her brother Danny in a foreign land, living as a Marine. But Kathy doesn’t just see him; she is there. Join Kathy as her life in America is disturbed by vivid glimpses into her brother’s struggle overseas. Through these dreams she is afforded a unique perspective on those living on both sides of the front line.

Author, Robert Black writes:

"Seventy-two years ago in August, the Second World War was over with the dropping of the second atomic bomb on mainland Japan. In June the Battle of Okinawa was the last major engagement. At that point in the war, the Japanese strategy was to make the American advance so bloody and so costly that they’d choose to negotiate peace rather than conquer the Japanese Home Islands. What made the battle especially horrible was the large number of civilian casualties. It’s estimated that 142,000 people – one-third of the civilian population – were killed. Many were victims of “collateral damage,” and others committed suicide, too ashamed of their defeat or frightened by Japanese propaganda that portrayed Americans as savage brutes.

"Those civilians were the ones that drew me to the battle and led me to think there might be a story there. I was especially interested in the stories of children who were caught in the conflict. Perhaps the best known of these are the accounts of the Himeyuri students and other Okinawan high school girls who were pressed into service as battlefield nurses.

"In another book I found told the story of a young girl who was given a makeshift white flag by the elderly couple sheltering her and told to go to the Americans. By the time she made it, she was being followed by an entire line of surrendering Japanese soldiers. If there was to be a book for me to write about Okinawa, it would involve characters like these children, because my readers could relate to them."

Praise for Black’s books: “Very highly recommended… quite special and unique approach to storytelling.” – Midwest Book Review

An original, deftly crafted, inherently absorbing and thoroughly entertaining read for children ages 11 to 15, “The Eyes of the Enemy” by Robert Black is unreservedly recommended for personal reading lists, as well as school and community library Historical Fiction collections for young readers.”  – Children’s Bookwatch

It is 1944, and the war between the United States and Japan rages across the Pacific. Back in Nebraska, Kathy Syverson has been having unusual dreams—very unusual dreams. She sees her brother Danny in a foreign land, living as a Marine. But Kathy doesn’t just see him; she is there. Join Kathy as her life in America is disturbed by vivid glimpses into her brother’s struggle overseas. Through these dreams she is afforded a unique perspective on those living on both sides of the front line.

Author, Robert Black writes:

"Seventy-two years ago in August, the Second World War was over with the dropping of the second atomic bomb on mainland Japan. In June the Battle of Okinawa was the last major engagement. At that point in the war, the Japanese strategy was to make the American advance so bloody and so costly that they’d choose to negotiate peace rather than conquer the Japanese Home Islands. What made the battle especially horrible was the large number of civilian casualties. It’s estimated that 142,000 people – one-third of the civilian population – were killed. Many were victims of “collateral damage,” and others committed suicide, too ashamed of their defeat or frightened by Japanese propaganda that portrayed Americans as savage brutes.

"Those civilians were the ones that drew me to the battle and led me to think there might be a story there. I was especially interested in the stories of children who were caught in the conflict. Perhaps the best known of these are the accounts of the Himeyuri students and other Okinawan high school girls who were pressed into service as battlefield nurses.

"In another book I found told the story of a young girl who was given a makeshift white flag by the elderly couple sheltering her and told to go to the Americans. By the time she made it, she was being followed by an entire line of surrendering Japanese soldiers. If there was to be a book for me to write about Okinawa, it would involve characters like these children, because my readers could relate to them."

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